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Stories of the Scholar Mohammad Amin Sheikho - Part Six - His Life His Deeds His Way to Al'lah - cover

Stories of the Scholar Mohammad Amin Sheikho - Part Six - His Life His Deeds His Way to Al'lah

Mohammad Amin Sheikho, A. K. John Alias Al-Dayrani

Publisher: BookRix

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Summary

CONTENTS:

- The French Weapons of Anjar Citadel Are Taken by Syrian Rebels.
- Man's Loyalty to His Country Is Paramount.
- Lack of Commitment Leads to Failure of the Revolution.
- Our Man Rises to the Challenge in the Region of Al-Sheikh Mountain.
- The Rebellion against French Rule.
- An Entire County Is Sentenced to Death.
- Purer than the Whitest Snow.
- The Conspiracy against the Head of the Citadel.
- Persistence in Prayer Leads to Enlightenment.
- Morality Is Maintained.
- Timely Repayment of a Debt.
- Who Dares to Challenge the Envoys of God Will Never Succeed.
- The Disciple Repeats the Sheikh's Lesson.
- This Man Gave Us His Full Support.
- An Honourable Outcome.
- The Story of the Deceased who Prayed at His own Funeral.
Available since: 09/24/2018.
Print length: 157 pages.

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