Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
The Grandees - America's Sephardic Elite - cover

The Grandees - America's Sephardic Elite

Stephen Birmingham

Publisher: Open Road Media

  • 0
  • 2
  • 0

Summary

The New World’s earliest Jewish immigrants and their unique, little-known history: A New York Times bestseller from the author of Life at the Dakota. In 1654, twenty-three Jewish families arrived in New Amsterdam (now New York) aboard a French privateer. They were the Sephardim, members of a proud orthodox sect that had served as royal advisors and honored professionals under Moorish rule in Spain and Portugal but were then exiled from their homeland by intolerant monarchs. A small, closed, and intensely private community, the Sephardim soon established themselves as businessmen and financiers, earning great wealth. They became powerful forces in society, with some, like banker Haym Salomon, even providing financial support to George Washington’s army during the American Revolution.   Yet despite its major role in the birth and growth of America, this extraordinary group has remained virtually impenetrable and unknowable to outsiders. From author of “Our Crowd” Stephen Birmingham, The Grandees delves into the lives of the Sephardim and their historic accomplishments, illuminating the insulated world of these early Americans. Birmingham reveals how these families, with descendants including poet Emma Lazarus, Barnard College founder Annie Nathan Meyer, and Supreme Court Justice Benjamin N. Cardozo, influenced—and continue to influence—American society.
Available since: 12/15/2015.
Print length: 386 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • White Americans Feel Ceiling Effect - cover

    White Americans Feel Ceiling Effect

    PBS NewsHour

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    While White Americans Feel ‘Ceiling Effect,’ Blacks and Latinos Find Aspiration 
    A new study shows that since 2006 whites have grown more pessimistic about their economic outlook while African-Americans and Latinos have grown more optimistic. Ray Suarez talks with Matt Barreto of Latino Decisions and Ellis Cose, author of The End of Anger to examine the differences and shift in attitudes.
    Show book
  • I Wrote This Book Because I Love You - cover

    I Wrote This Book Because I Love...

    Tim Kreider

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    *A People Top 10 Book of 2018*The New York Times essayist and author of We Learn Nothing, Tim Kreider trains his singular power of observation on his (often befuddling) relationships with women.Psychologists have told him he’s a psychologist. Philosophers have told him he’s a philosopher. Religious groups have invited him to speak. He had a cult following as a cartoonist. But, above all else, Tim Kreider is an essayist—one whose deft prose, uncanny observations, dark humor, and emotional vulnerability have earned him deserved comparisons to David Sedaris, Sarah Vowell, and the late David Foster Wallace (who was himself a fan of Kreider’s humor).“Beautifully written, with just enough humor to balance his spikiness” (Booklist), I Wrote This Book Because I Love You focuses Tim’s unique perception and wit on his relationships with women—romantic, platonic, and the murky in-between. He talks about his difficulty finding lasting love and seeks to understand his commitment issues by tracking down the John Hopkins psychologist who tested him for a groundbreaking study on attachment when he was a toddler. He talks about his valued female friendships, one of which landed him on a circus train bound for Mexico. He talks about his time teaching young women at an upstate New York college, and the profound lessons they wound up teaching him. And in a hugely popular essay that originally appeared in The New York Times, he talks about his nineteen-year-old cat, wondering if it’s the most enduring relationship he’ll ever have.“In a style reminiscent of Orwell, E.B. White and David Sedaris” (The New York Times Book Review), each of these pieces is “heartbreaking, brutal, and hilarious” (Judd Apatow), and collectively they cement Kreider’s place among the best essayists working today.
    Show book
  • Luftwaffe Fighter Ace - cover

    Luftwaffe Fighter Ace

    Norbert Hannig

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A World War II memoir by the renowned German fighter pilot—from his Hitler Youth glider training to combat missions against the Soviet Air Force. Herr Norbert Hanning’s wartime career makes for fascinating and highly informative reading on an aspect of the 1939-45 air war not often covered in the English language; primarily that of the campaign against the Soviet Union. He was one of the midwar-generation Luftwaffe fighter pilots and began operations with JG 54 on the eastern (Leningrad) front in early 1943; initially flying Messerschmitt Bf 109s before transitioning to the Focke-Wulf Fw 190. He became a Staffel CO and was credited with 42 victories, also serving with JV 44 (whose CO was Adolf Galland); he then returned to Germany towards the closing stages of the war to convert to Me 262 jet fighters. Many and varied were his experiences in action against the rejuvenated Soviet Air Force in the east, and the powerful western Allies over the homeland during the final chaotic months of hostilities, which culminated in his captivity. John Weal’s skillful translation ensures that the fluid and descriptive style of the author is preserved. Thankfully, also, Norbert was a keen photographer who shot a profusion of images, all previously unpublished, many of which appear in this important book.
    Show book
  • Austin Osman Spare - The Life and Legend of London's Lost Artist; Revised & Expanded Edition - cover

    Austin Osman Spare - The Life...

    Phil Baker, Alan Moore

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    London has harbored many curious characters, but few more curious than the artist and visionary Austin Osman Spare (1886–1956).A controversial enfant terrible of the Edwardian art world, the young Spare was hailed as a genius and a new Aubrey Beardsley, while George Bernard Shaw reportedly said "Spare's medicine is too strong for the average man." But Spare was never made for worldly success and he went underground, falling out of the gallery system to live in poverty and obscurity south of the river. Absorbed in occultism and sorcery, voyaging into inner dimensions, and surrounding himself with cats and familiar spirits, he continued to produce extraordinary art while developing a magical philosophy of pleasure, obsession, and the subjective nature of reality. Today Spare is both forgotten and famous, a cult figure whose modest life has been much mythologized since his death. This groundbreaking biographical study offers wide-ranging insights into Spare's art, mind, and world, reconnecting him with the art history that ignored him and exploring his parallel London; a bygone place of pub pianists, wealthy alchemists, and monstrous owls.
    Show book
  • Seven Women - And the Secret of Their Greatness - cover

    Seven Women - And the Secret of...

    Eric Metaxas

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Read the stories ofJoan of Arc,Susanna Wesley,Hannah More,Sister Maria of Paris,Corrie ten Boom,Rosa Parks,and Mother Teresa!In this highly anticipated follow-up to the enormously successful Seven Men, New York Times bestselling author Eric Metaxas gives us seven captivating portraits of some of the greatest women who ever lived, each of whom changed the course of history by following God’s call upon their lives—now in paperback.  
    Teenaged Joan of Arc followed God’s call and liberated her country, dying a heroic martyr’s death. Susanna Wesley had nineteen children and gave the world its most significant evangelist and its greatest hymn writer, her sons John and Charles. Corrie ten Boom, arrested for hiding Dutch Jews from the Nazis, survived the horrors of a concentration camp to astonish the world by forgiving her tormentors. And Rosa Parks’s deep sense of justice and unshakable dignity and faith helped launch the twentieth-century’s greatest social movement. 
    Writing in his trademark conversational and engaging style, Eric Metaxas reveals how the extraordinary women profiled here achieved their greatness, inspiring readers to lives guided by a call beyond themselves 
     
    Show book
  • Rotting Man Goes to Town - And conversations with John Manning - cover

    Rotting Man Goes to Town - And...

    Shawn Irvin Manning

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Rotting Man Goes to Town deals with an adult relationship; which is in deep trauma from the outset of the story. Its technique is predominately dual narration, going from him to her vantage points. There are two sides to every story. Some of the language is hard-hitting, with angry scenes or mindsets, including some swearing. Political incorrectness exists in parts. The emotions are raw. It is a compelling and authentic read. It begins badly. How will it end? 
    The initial setting is in America, with flashbacks to Britain, meant to counter the: hurt, sadness and anger, by the use of the device of injecting past comedic episodes. Levity and tragedy are seen in animal antics. Thus, the humorous scenes are meant to bring a balance to the novel overall. 
    With the exception of the animals’ names, which remain true, all human names have been changed.
    Show book