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30 Humorous Masterpieces you have to read before you die (Golden Deer Classics) - cover

30 Humorous Masterpieces you have to read before you die (Golden Deer Classics)

Lewis Carroll, Jane Austen, Oscar Wilde, Mark Twain, John Kendrick Bangs, Sinclair Lewis, P. G. Wodehouse, H. G. Wells, Jerome Klapka Jerome, Frank R. Stockton, Natsume Sōseki, Gilbert Keith Chesterton, Edwin Abbot, Aldous Huxley, Silver Deer Classics

Publisher: Oregan Publishing

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Summary

This book,contains now several HTML tables of contents
The first table of contents lists the titles of all novels included in this volume. By clicking on one of those titles you will be redirected to the beginning of that work, where you'll find a new TOC.

This book contains the following works arranged alphabetically by authors last names

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions [Edwin Abbott Abbott]
Lady Susan [Jane Austen]
R. Holmes & Co. [John Kendrick Bangs]
Mrs. Raffles [John Kendrick Bangs]
The Triumphs of Eugène Valmont [Robert Barr]
Love Insurance [Earl Derr Biggers]
The Mirror of Kong Ho [Ernest Bramah Smith]
The Ghost-Extinguisher [Frank Gelett Burgess]
Erewhon, or Over The Range [Samuel Butler]
Jurgen: A Comedy of Justice [James Branch Cabell]
Sylvie and Bruno [Lewis Carroll]
The Napoleon of Notting Hill [Gilbert Keith Chesterton]
The Strange Adventures of Mr. Middleton [Wardon Allan Curtis]
Our Mutual Friend [Charles Dickens]
Brother Jacob [George Eliot]
Cheerful—By Request [Edna Ferber]
Cabbages and Kings [O. Henry]
Crome Yellow [Aldous Huxley]
All Roads Lead to Calvary [Jerome Klapka Jerome]
Babbitt [Sinclair Lewis]
Parnassus On Wheels [Christopher Morley]
Beasts and Super-Beasts [Saki]
A Tale of Negative Gravity [Frank R. Stockton]
Gulliver's Travels [Jonathan Swift]
Botchan [Natsume Sōseki]
A Voyage to the Moon [George Tucker]
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn [Mark Twain]
The Wheels of Chance [H. G. Wells]
The Canterville Ghost [Oscar Wilde]
My Man Jeeves [P. G. Wodehouse]

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