Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Tango Juliet Foxtrot - How did it all go wrong for British policing? - cover

Tango Juliet Foxtrot - How did it all go wrong for British policing?

Iain Donnelly

Publisher: Biteback Publishing

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

In thirty years on the front line of British policing, there is very little that Iain Donnelly didn't do: from being a uniformed constable on the beat in London to running counter-terrorism and surveillance operations, combatting child sexual exploitation and overseeing the investigation of the most serious crimes. During that time, he saw the job change irrevocably, to the point where the public no longer knows what to expect from the police and the police service no longer knows what to expect of itself.
Tango Juliet Foxtrot – police code for 'the job's fucked' – reveals how constant political meddling and a hostile media narrative have had a devastating impact on the morale of police officers and their ability to protect the public. With the organisation cut by 20,000 officers and 23,000 police staff, only 7 per cent of reported crime now results in a charge – compared with around 20 per cent ten years ago.
By turns fascinating and funny, poignant and uplifting, this compelling account paints a vivid picture of what life is really like for those tasked with keeping us safe – and, crucially, explores what needs to change to secure the future of British policing.
Available since: 11/09/2021.
Print length: 352 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Sons of Cain - A History of Serial Killers from the Stone Age to the Present - cover

    Sons of Cain - A History of...

    Peter Vronsky

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    From the author of Serial Killers: The Method and Madness of Monsters comes an in-depth examination of sexual serial killers throughout human history, how they evolved, and why we are drawn to their horrifying crimes. 
    Before the term was coined in 1981, there were no "serial killers." There were only "monsters"—killers society first understood as werewolves, vampires, ghouls and witches or, later, Hitchcockian psychos. 
    In Sons of Cain—a book that fills the gap between dry academic studies and sensationalized true crime—investigative historian Peter Vronsky examines our understanding of serial killing from its prehistoric anthropological evolutionary dimensions in the pre-civilization era (c. 15,000 BC) to today. Delving further back into human history and deeper into the human psyche than Serial Killers—Vronsky's 2004 book, which has been called "the definitive history of the phenomenon of serial murder"—he focuses strictly on sexual serial killers: thrill killers who engage in murder, rape, torture, cannibalism and necrophilia, as opposed to for-profit serial killers, including hit men, or "political" serial killers, like terrorists or genocidal murderers. 
    These sexual serial killers differ from all other serial killers in their motives and their foundations. They are uniquely human and—as popular culture has demonstrated—uniquely fascinating.
    Show book
  • Man Overboard - The Counterfeit Resurrection of Phil Champagne - cover

    Man Overboard - The Counterfeit...

    Burl Barer

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The true-crime story of one man’s life after his faked death, by the New York Times–bestselling author of Murder in the Family. 
     
    1982: Oregon businessman Phil Champagne, age 52, dies in a tragic boating accident off Lopez Island off the coast of Washington state. He is survived by one ex-wife, four adult children, an octogenarian mother, and two despondent brothers. Phil didn’t know he was dead until he read it in the paper. All things considered, he took it rather well. So did Phil’s brother, Mitch, the beneficiary of a 1.5 million dollar policy on Phil’s life. 
     
    1992: Washington restauranteur Harold Stegeman, famous for his thick, juicy steaks, is arrested by the Secret Service for printing counterfeit United States currency in an Idaho shed. In addition to the bogus bills, Stegeman also has a fraudulently obtained passport, a fabricated Cayman Island driver’s license, and Phil Champagne’s fingerprints. 
     
    When the uproarious reality of Harold Stegeman’s secret identity hit the headlines, the counterfeit resurrection of Phil Champagne became one of the most celebrated and hysterically funny true-crime stories of the twentieth century. And while every supermarket tabloid and television talk show hounded after the untold story, only Edgar Award–winner Burl Barer captured Champagne’s confidence and received permission to detail Phil’s post-mortem career of fraud, deception, trickery, lies, and fine prime rib, bringing to life the exploits of a man his family thought dead over a decade ago. 
     
    Includes bonus photographs, a police interrogation transcript, and an afterword by Phil Champagne 
     
    Praise for Man Overboard 
     
    “True crime at its best. . . . Barer has undeniable talent, pizzaz and imagination!” —Jack Olsen, New York Times–bestselling author of Son: A Psychopath and His Victims 
     
    “Crisp as a freshly printed C-note. Exceptionally clever and vastly entertaining!” —Lee Goldberg, #1 New York Times–bestselling author of Bone Canyon 
     
    “Barer does it again! A deft and dazzling display of solid research and rapier wit—a must for all true crime aficionados.” —Gary C. King, author of Love, Lies, and Murder
    Show book
  • The Truth About Aaron - My Journey to Understand My Brother - cover

    The Truth About Aaron - My...

    Jonathan Hernandez, Lars Anderson

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The unvarnished true story of the tragic life and death of Aaron Hernandez, the college All-American and New England Patriots star convicted of murder, told by one of the few people who knew him best, his brother. 
    To football fans, Aaron Hernandez was a superstar in the making. A standout at the University of Florida, he helped the Gators win the national title in 2008. Drafted by the New England Patriots, in his second full season with the team he and fellow Patriots' tight end Rob Gronkowski set records for touchdowns and yardage, and with Tom Brady, led New England to Super Bowl XLVI in 2012. But Aaron's NFL career ended as quickly as it began. On June 26, 2013, he was arrested at his North Attleboro home, charged with the murder of Odin Lloyd, and released by the Patriots. Convicted of first-degree murder, Aaron was sentenced to life in prison without parole. On May 15, 2014, while on trial for Lloyd's murder, Aaron was indicted for two more murders. Five days after being acquitted for those double murders, he committed suicide in his jail cell. Aaron Hernandez was twenty-seven years old. 
    In this clear-eyed, emotionally devastating biography—a family memoir combining football and true crime—Jonathan (formerly known by his nickname DJ) Hernandez speaks out fully for the first time about the brother he knew. Jonathan draws on his own recollections as well as thousands of pages of prison letters and other sources to give us a full portrait of a star athlete and troubled young man who would become a murderer, and the darkness that consumed him. Jonathan does not portray Aaron as a victim; he does not lay the blame for his crimes on his illness. He speaks openly about Aaron's talent, his sexuality, his crimes and incarceration, and the CTE that ravaged him—scientists found that upon his death, Aaron had the brain of a sixty-seven-year old suffering from the same condition. Filled with headline-making revelations, The Truth About Aaron is a shocking and moving account of promise, tragedy, and loss—of one man's descent into rage and violence, as told by the person who knew him more closely than anyone else.
    Show book
  • The Trials of Eroy Brown - The Murder Case That Shook the Texas Prison System - cover

    The Trials of Eroy Brown - The...

    Michael Berryhill

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “Berryhill’s account of this infamous 30-year-old murder case . . . Provides a jarring portrait of a once-medieval state prison.” —Publishers Weekly   In April 1981, two white Texas prison officials died at the hands of a black inmate at the Ellis prison farm near Huntsville. Warden Wallace Pack and farm manager Billy Moore were the highest-ranking Texas prison officials ever to die in the line of duty. The warden was drowned face down in a ditch. The farm manager was shot once in the head with the warden’s gun. The man who admitted to killing them, a burglar and robber named Eroy Brown, surrendered meekly, claiming self-defense.   In any other era of Texas prison history, Brown’s fate would have seemed certain: execution. But in 1980, federal judge William Wayne Justice had issued a sweeping civil rights ruling in which he found that prison officials had systematically and often brutally violated the rights of Texas inmates. In the light of that landmark prison civil rights case, Ruiz v. Estelle, Brown had a chance of being believed.  The Trials of Eroy Brown, the first book devoted to Brown’s astonishing defense, is based on trial documents, exhibits, and journalistic accounts of Brown’s three trials, which ended in his acquittal. Michael Berryhill presents Brown’s story in his own words, set against the backdrop of the chilling plantation mentality of Texas prisons. Brown’s attorneys—Craig Washington, Bill Habern, and Tim Sloan—undertook heroic strategies to defend him, even when the state refused to pay their fees. The Trials of Eroy Brown tells a landmark story of prison civil rights and the collapse of Jim Crow justice in Texas.
    Show book
  • Cult of the Great Eleven - cover

    Cult of the Great Eleven

    Samuel Fort

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Cult of the Great Eleven is a true account of one of the twentieth century’s weirdest and most mysterious cults. Human and animal sacrifices, vanishings, the preserved corpse of a teenage cult princess, angelic encounters, a woman cooked in an oven, a mother chained to her bed for two months, resurrection experiments, refrigeration warehouses for the dead, abductions, nocturnal rituals, orgies, a breathing universe, an esoteric tome known as The Great Sixth Seal, hints of Hecate worship, and a post-apocalyptic world ruled by eleven queens from a hill in Hollywood… 
    The United States witnessed an explosion of cult activity in the 1920s that today is almost inconceivable. California, in particular, was a haven for an estimated 200,000 cultists, with over 400 active cults in southern California alone. These ranged from “love cults” that conducted ritual orgies to “devil worshipping” cults that branded their members with hot irons and beheaded their enemies.  
    Among all these, the Simi Valley's “Divine Order of the Royal Arms of the Great Eleven” was considered by many to be the most extraordinary. A death cult, the Great Eleven was founded by May Otis Blackburn, Portland, Oregon’s unheralded filmmaking pioneer, and Ruth Wieland, her luscious femme fatale daughter. The cult was so bizarre that accounts of its activities “elicited expressions of amazement” from justices on the California Supreme Court in 1931, who admitted, “they have never heard anything so weird.”  
    Not until the nephew of oil magnate J.B. Dabney admitted he had been a member of the cult would the world at large learn of the existence the “divine order.” Not until detectives opened a trap door in the floor of a cult couple’s Venice cottage would the world be exposed to its darkest secrets.
    Show book
  • The Assassin's Accomplice - Mary Surratt and the Plot to Kill Abraham Lincoln - cover

    The Assassin's Accomplice - Mary...

    Kate Clifford Larson

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In The Assassin's Accomplice, historian Kate Clifford Larson tells the gripping story of Mary Surratt, a little-known conspirator in the plot to kill Abraham Lincoln, and the first woman ever to be executed by the federal government. A Confederate sympathizer, Surratt ran the boarding house where the conspirators met to plan Lincoln's assassination. Set against the backdrop of the Civil War, The Assassin's Accomplice tells the intricate story of the Lincoln conspiracy through the eyes of its only female participant, offering a fresh perspective on America's most famous murder. 
    "A masterful recounting of the surprisingly wide and intricate conspiracy of Southern sympathizers who formed the murder plot, focusing on perhaps the most controversial figure in the story." -Minneapolis Star-Tribune 
    "Larson captures brilliantly the atmosphere of Mary Surratt's trial in a crowded court room.… Her description of the drama of Mary's last hours, when she was broken by a death sentence that neither she nor her lawyers had believed possible, makes compelling reading." -Spectator (UK) 
    "Historical reporting at its very best." -Larry Cox, King Features Syndicate 
    "[A] spirited narrative… the tale itself could not be better told, nor could the cast of characters be brought more to life." -Publishers Weekly
    Show book