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180 Masterpieces You Should Read Before You Die (Vol1) - A Timeless Journey Through Literary Masterpieces - cover

180 Masterpieces You Should Read Before You Die (Vol1) - A Timeless Journey Through Literary Masterpieces

Edgar Allan Poe, George Eliot, William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, Lewis Carroll, Mark Twain, Louisa May Alcott, Jane Austen, Oscar Wilde, Herman Melville, Charlotte Brontë, Daniel Defoe, Henry David Thoreau, Emily Brontë, Walt Whitman, Henry James, Hans Christian Andersen, D. H. Lawrence, Anthony Trollope, Sigmund Freud, Marcus Aurelius, Frederick Douglass, William Makepeace Thackeray, Anne Brontë, John Keats, Anton Chekhov, Marcel Proust, Charles Baudelaire, Walter Scott, Sun Tzu, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Upton Sinclair, Kahlil Gibran, Ernest Hemingway, Agatha Christie, Hermann Hesse, E.M. Forster, Theodore Dreiser, Plato, H. G. Wells, Nikolái Gógol, Grimm Brothers, Wallace D. Wattles, Víctor Hugo, Fyodor Dostoevsky, James Joyce, T. S. Eliot, James Allen, Thomas Hardy, Jules Verne, Miguel de Cervantes, Leo Tolstoy, Voltaire

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

180 Masterpieces You Should Read Before You Die (Vol.1) encapsulates a breathtaking odyssey through time, presenting a tapestry of narratives that span across varied eras, cultures, and themes. From the profound depths of Dostoevsky's psychological explorations to the whimsical realms of Lewis Carroll, this anthology transcends the ordinary, offering readers a kaleidoscopic view of human experience through its divergence in literary styles, including epic poetry, groundbreaking novels, and profound essays. Not only does it capture the evolution of literature, but it also highlights pivotal works that have shaped our understanding of storytelling, identity, and existential inquiry, making this collection invaluable for its breadth and depth of human thought and emotion. The contributing authors and editors, pillars in the literary and philosophical worlds, bring to the table an unparalleled diversity of backgrounds. These figures, who have each left an indelible mark on literary and intellectual history, range from the existential ponderings of Marcus Aurelius to the introspective narratives of Virginia Woolf. Their collective works, reflective of various historical, cultural, and literary movements, provide a rich panorama of the human condition, exploring themes of love, despair, adventure, and the relentless quest for knowledge and truth. This anthology not only serves as a testament to their genius but also as a nexus where their diverse voices harmonize to deepen our understanding of their shared humanity. This collection presents a unique opportunity for readers to engage with the minds of some of the most influential authors in history. It beckons the curious, the scholarly, and the seeker of wisdom to embark on a journey that promises an enriching confluence of perspectives. Whether for educational purposes, personal enlightenment, or the sheer joy of discovering the multifaceted dimensions of human expression, 180 Masterpieces You Should Read Before You Die (Vol.1) is an essential addition to the library of any true lover of literature and the human story it continues to tell through the ages.
Available since: 12/13/2023.
Print length: 26018 pages.

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