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Lives of the Signers to the Declaration of Independence - cover

Lives of the Signers to the Declaration of Independence

Charles Augustus Goodrich

Publisher: e-artnow

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Summary

The venerated emigrants who first planted America, and most of their distinguished successors who laid the foundation of our civil liberty, have found a resting place in the peaceful grave. But the virtues which adorned both these generations; their patience in days of suffering; the courage and patriotic zeal with which they asserted their rights; and the wisdom they displayed in laying the foundations of our government; will be held in lasting remembrance. Table of Contents:  John Hancock Samuel Adams John Adams Robert Treat Paine Elbridge Gerry Josiah Bartlett William Whipple Matthew Thornton Stephen Hopkins William Ellery Roger Sherman Samuel Huntington William Williams Oliver Wolcott William Floyd Philip Livingston Francis Lewis Lewis Morris Henry Misner Richard Stockton John Witherspoon Francis Hopeinson John Hart Abraham Clark Robert Morris Benjamin Rush Benjamin Franklin John Morton Geoge Clymer James Smith George Taylor James Wilson George Ross Caesar Rodney George Read Thomas M'Kean Samuel Chase William Paca Thomas Stone Charles Carroll George Wythe Richard Henry Lee Thomas Jefferson Benjamin Harrison Thomas Nelson, Jun Francis Lightfoot Lee Carter Braxton William Hooper Joseph Hewes John Penn Edward Rutledge Thomas Heyward Thomas Lynch, Jun Arthur Middleton Button Gwinnett Lyman Hall George Walton
Available since: 12/15/2023.
Print length: 432 pages.

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