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Baptism of Fire - In Love and War #3 - cover

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Baptism of Fire - In Love and War #3

Cora Buhlert

Publisher: Pegasus Pulp Publishing

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Summary

Cadet Anjali Patel had hoped for something more exciting than guard duty for her first mission with the legendary Shakyri Expeditionary Corps, the best fighters in the Empire of Worlds. 
However, this boring job quickly turns hot, when an enemy convoy comes up the mountain pass Anjali is supposed to guard. 
This is a prequel story of 4500 words or approx. 18 print pages to the "In Love and War" series, but may be read as a standalone. 
Nominated for the 2018 eFestival of Word Best of the Independent eBooks Award

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