Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
The Genetic Equation - In a Galaxy Far Far AwRy #5 - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have more than 500,000 other books you can enjoy!

The Genetic Equation - In a Galaxy Far Far AwRy #5

Liam Gibbs

Publisher: Liam Gibbs

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

What else should you expect when you give your address to your enemies? 
Master Asinine has come up with a new scheme to rid himself of his friend-turned-nemesis, Legion: to combine the Face Blitzkrieg with gene-altering technology and make a dangerous weapon he hopes Schizophrenic won't ridicule him for. Nice try. Schizophrenic's on the ball. 
But when Master Asinine and his gang of goons show up on the Good Guys' home turf, Station One, with their new genetic weapons, they threaten to turn their enemies into nothing more than organic soup. Now the Good Guys have to ward off the Bad Guys, keep out of the line of fire, and protect a protestor who has shown up to speak against the lack of females in an all-male military. 
Can Legion simultaneously fend off the Bad Guys, impress visiting Good Guy overseer Brigadier General Patton, and keep his sanity? It's not even Monday!

Other books that might interest you

  • Magician Interrupted - cover

    Magician Interrupted

    S. V. Brown

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    AWOL Act 
     
    Paris is sick of being a magician, the Spell Caster. Where he comes from it just means being a paranormal-nerd. He hears about Career Worlds, sees the ads and decides he’s going to become a space marine! But first, he has to get away from the stupid Trinity pit and is declared AWOL by the Assembly who decide what magicians can and cannot do. Well, screw that! 
     
    As he breaks away he dreams of fighting … someone, defending his world against … who knows what, and body building. From the moment he breaks away from O’rah, the Spell Magnifier, and Gargoyle, the Spell Binder, Paris finds life not quite what he was expecting especially when his cat, Path, joins the marines with him. This was his time to shine! What's worse? The marines seem to like his cat more than him.
    Show book
  • The Snark Handbook: Clichés Edition - Overused Buzzwords Hackneyed Phrases and Other Misuses of the English Language - cover

    The Snark Handbook: Clichés...

    Lawrence Dorfman

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    CLICHÉ: nounEtymology: French, literally, printer's stereotype, from past participle of clichér, to stereotype, of imitative originDate: 18921 : a trite phrase or expression; also : the idea expressed by it2 : a hackneyed theme, characterization, or situation3 : something that has become overly familiar or commonplace In the words of Stephen Fry, “It is a cliché that most clichés are true, but then like most clichés, that cliché is untrue.” Clichés are like rationalizations: try going a week without using one. It can't be done! They are the hobgoblin of little minds. For most of us, once you begin to take notice, they are fingernails on a chalkboard.From Shakespeare to Shakira; in music, on television, at the movies; in the boardroom, on a conference call, online or in person, clichés have taken over the world. While some nitwits might say they're just misunderstood, they didn't start out that way. There was a time when they were new and vibrant, clever and pithy. Now they're just predictable—a vapid collection of much-too-familiar descriptions or metaphors that often replace smart conversation, speech, or writing.This book is a collection of the most overused phrases of all time. Hopefully, it'll make you laugh. Hopefully, it'll make them think. And at the end of the day, if the early bird catches the worm and the slow and steady win the race . . . Please . . . kill . . . me . . . now.
    Show book
  • The Collected Works Volume One - Rates of Exchange The History Man and Stepping Westward - cover

    The Collected Works Volume One -...

    Malcolm Bradbury

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Three satires of academia by the beloved British critic, teacher, and novelist—including his “outstanding” comic masterpiece, The History Man (The Guardian).   “A satirist of great assurance and accomplishment,” Malcolm Bradbury remains one of the sharpest comic novelists of the twentieth century (The Observer). In Rates of Exchange and Stepping Westward, as “in almost all of Bradbury’s novels, the most frequently recurring theme is that of the slightly naïve, liberal innocent, usually an academic, hilariously abroad in an unfamiliar, and occasionally slightly threatening, context” (The Guardian). In The History Man, the tables are turned, and the professor himself is the threat, resulting in “grim wit, chill comedy and a fictional energy which is as imaginative as the tale is shocking” (A. S. Byatt).  Rates of Exchange: University lecturer and seasoned international traveler Angus Petworth is unprepared for the oddities of culture and circumstance that await him on the other side of the iron curtain—in the eastern European nation of Slaka. In two eventful weeks, the professor gives an incendiary interview, is seduced by a femme fatale, and becomes embroiled in a plot of international intrigue. Satirizing everything from critics and diplomats to Marxism and academia, Rates of Exchange is a witty and lighthearted novel of cultural interchange at the height of the Cold War, shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize.   “Explosively funny.” —The Daily Telegraph  The History Man: Bradbury’s classic skewering of 1970s academia and ideological hypocrisy centers around Professor Howard Kirk, who prides himself on being the most highly evolved teacher on campus. But beneath Kirk’s scholarly bohemianism and studied cool is a ruthless, self-serving Machiavellian streak. Kirk is vain and bigoted, dismissing female students and colleagues while releasing vitriol against those who contradict him, particularly his clever, wayward wife, Barbara, the long-suffering mother of his two children. Someone needs to teach him a lesson . . .   “[A] genuinely comic novel.” —The New York Times  Stepping Westward: At the height of the swinging sixties, mediocre British writer James Walker accepts an academic post in America for a year he’ll never forget. As Benedict Arnold University’s writer in residence, he finds himself something of a celebrity—his work, though met with shrugs at home, is the subject of vibrant scholarly criticism among American academics. But the buttoned-up professor is about to take a crash course in culture shock taught by spirited advocates of free love and aggressively ambitious colleagues.   “Highly entertaining.” —Margaret Drabble, The Sunday Times
    Show book
  • I'm Not Okay! Is It Just Me? - Like New and Somewhat Improved - cover

    I'm Not Okay! Is It Just Me? -...

    Ken Davis

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Two great performances, one audio-book!
    I'm Not Okay!
    Who, but a wise guy would engineer some of the stunts Davis has pulled and then have the audacity to talk about them? Like the time he shot a screwdriver through the ceiling of his kitchen with an M-80 firecracker. And who else would have an international collection of airline barf bags? Here's some of the best comedy you've ever experienced. And it's all wrapped up in a message of hope that can change your life forever.
    Is It Just Me?
    Ken Davis offers some of his funniest material to date during an appearance in the heart of Dairyland. One of America's favorite speakers, Ken joins Wisconsin's famed "cheeseheads" for a brilliant performance that pays tribute to veterans, explores the differences between men and women, and ponders the question: Is It Just Me?
    
    ©2005 Ken Davis; (P)2005 Oasis Audio, LLC
    Show book
  • I Was a Teenage Dwarf - Stories - cover

    I Was a Teenage Dwarf - Stories

    Max Shulman

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    This hysterical follow-up to The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis details the lifelong pursuits of the pint-sized Don Juan Each chapter—straight from the diaries of Dobie Gillis—is a true experience from our hero’s life between the ages of thirteen to thirty. All the experiences are about girls, because that’s what Dobie’s life is about: girls.   In “Girls: Their Cause and Cure,” Dobie is a sixth-grader with the serious issue of being shorter than every girl in his class. A petite cellist with leaky tear ducts is his best bet until a beautiful rock-and-roll chick arrives at school. Dobie falls hard for the new girl, not realizing that she’s due for a growth spurt.   Two years later, Dobie has more important concerns. In “Puberty Is Here to Stay,” his girlfriend, Tuckie Webb, goes away to summer camp and comes back more stunning than ever. Too bad she has hulking seventeen-year-old Murder McIntyre attached to her arm.   Fifteen years later, Dobie weds his college sweetheart, Chloe. Marriage, it turns out, is the cure for Dobie’s obsession with girls, but money worries now plague our hero’s mind. When baby Pete arrives and Chloe spends all their cash on vitamins, nursery school, fencing lessons, and fancy dogs, Dobie fears he’ll never have the nest egg he desires. Then he realizes that he already has the two things a man really needs: a beautiful, loving wife and a happy child.
    Show book
  • Those Rapping Republicans 2012 Debate Number One - A fictional versed-rhyme account - cover

    Those Rapping Republicans 2012...

    Gerard O'Halloran

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A very funny fictional versed-rhyme account of the 2012 Republican Party primary debate number one featuring the following candidates: Congresswoman Michelle Bachman , Mister Herman Cain, Speaker Newt Gingrich, Congressman Ron Paul, Governor Mitt Romney, Senator Rick Santorum and Governor Rick Perry, who are interviewed by Brian Williams of NBC, John Harwood of CNBC and Chris Wallace of Fox News.
    Show book