Do you want to read 1 year without limits?
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
Super 40 - Super 40 #1 - cover

Super 40 - Super 40 #1

Lucy Woodhull

Publisher: Lucy Woodhull

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Divorced, broke, and living with her parents—forty-year-old Shannon Johnson is clearly winning at life. 
She’s so awesome, she accidentally uses a tampon irradiated in Kazakhstan. Suddenly, this mush-mouthed loser becomes a superheroine who can shoot menstrual cramps from her fingers. 
No, really. 
But her new mission of saving NYC’s abused women gets complex for Super 40. With her teleporting partner Dolly Poppin’, Super 40 runs afoul of domestic abusers, jerky news anchors, and an evil scientist with cats. Even worse, someone’s trying to kill the partners for reasons unknown, which is just plain rude. Is it the mysterious flying Antihero? The robo-kittens? Or one of the delightful internet trolls always eager to call Shannon fat and ugly? 
No matter, for the amazing Super 40 will get her mojo back through butt-kicking, self-love, and some hot dates with the world’s yummiest superhero. 
If you ever thought Bridget Jones needed a borked-out superpower, you won’t be able to put down the hilarious adventures of SUPER 40. She’s a heroine for every woman society deems unsuitable, which is basically all of us. 
To heck with that.

Who read this book also read:

  • Mommyfesto - We Solemnly Swear ($%*!) Because We Have Kids: A Book about the Reality of Parenting - cover

    Mommyfesto - We Solemnly Swear...

    Leanne Shirtliffe

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    The goal of parenting is to train your children to have slightly better manners than a dog. If you’ve achieved that by the end of day (or even if you’ve failed majestically trying), it is important to celebrate the little things. Like bedtime. And screw-top wine. And with Mommyfesto, by award-winning humor blogger Leanne Shirtliffe, you’ll learn the nitty-gritty about what it means to be a real parent. Without resorting to stereotypical “poo and pee jokes,” Shirtliffe finds humor in the insanity of raising children and celebrates using how-to-parent-like-an-expert books as paperweights for your child’s art collection in the recycling bin. Mommyfesto contains more than 150 realistic (and downright humorous) truths about parenting, such as: A Band-Aid and a kiss solve most daily crises. So does talking like a pirate. Expectations of child rearing should be thrown out the window. It’s better than throwing out your child. If you can survive parented piano lessons, you can survive a zombie apocalypse. And much more!Mommyfesto offers parents the opportunity to laugh at the absurdity of childrearing and to realize there is no right way to do it. Blank pages in the back of the book encourage moms (and dads, too!) to add their beliefs—whether bizarre, funny, or even serious—to the book, making this a go-to guide for generations of crazed parents.Leanne's blog, IronicMom.com, was recently declared the Best Humour Blog by the Canadian Weblog Awards, a juried competition. IronicMom.com garners 8,000–13,000 hits per month and has been featured on high-traffic sites such as The Christian Science Monitor, ProBlogger, Wordpress’ home page, Canadian Family, CBC, the Calgary Herald, and Sweet Mama. IronicMom.com was recognized as one of the top five new blogs by the Canadian Weblog Awards (2010) and as the top parenting blog in Calgary (a city of over 1 million people) and as the Most Laugh–Out–Loud Funny blog by Sweet Mama, a popular Canadian website.
    Show book
  • The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole - cover

    The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole

    Sue Townsend

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    “Townsend’s wit is razor sharp” as her self-proclaimed intellectual adolescent hero continues his hilarious angst-filled secret diary (TheMirror).  I can’t wait until I am fully mature and can make urban conversation with intellectuals.   Growing up among inferiors in Great Britain isn’t easy for a sensitive fifteen-year-old “poet of the Midlands” like Adrian Mole, considering everything in the world is conspiring to scar him for life: His hormones are in a maelstrom; his mother is pregnant (at her age!); his girlfriend, Pandora, is in shutdown; radio stardom isn’t panning out; he’s become allergic to non-precious metals; and passing his exams is as dire a crisis as the Falkland Islands.   From weathering a profound but shaky romance with the love of his life to negotiating his parents’ reconciliation to writing his poetry on restroom walls (why on earth did he sign his name?), “Adrian Mole is as engaging as ever” (Time Out). The sequel to the beloved TheSecret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13¾ continues Adrian’s chronicle of angst, which has sold more than twenty million copies worldwide, and been adapted for television and staged as a musical. Adrian Mole is truly “a phenomenon” (The Washington Post).  
    Show book
  • The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3 4 - cover

    The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole...

    Sue Townsend

    • 2
    • 2
    • 0
    British adolescent angst has never been so “laugh-out-loud funny” as in this first encounter with a sharp-witted, pining, and achingly honest underdog (The New York Times).  Perhaps when I am famous and my diary is discovered, people will understand the torment of being a 13¾-year-old undiscovered intellectual.   Adrian Mole is approaching fourteen, and like all radical intellectuals he must amass his grievances: His acne vulgaris is grotesque; his crush, Pandora, received seventeen Valentine’s Day cards; his PE teacher is a sadist; he fears his parents’ marriage is over since they no longer smoke together; his dog has gone AWOL; no one appreciates his poetry; and Animal Farm has set him off pork for good. If everyone were as appalled as Adrian Mole, it would be a better world.   Introducing “one of literature’s most endearing figures”: a luckless adolescent of great expectations and dwindling patience who knows all—or believes he does—and tells all (The Observer). First published in 1982, Adrian’s chronicle of angst has sold more than twenty million copies worldwide, spawned seven sequels, and been adapted for television and staged as a musical. Here’s where it all began.
    Show book
  • Science of Parenthood - Thoroughly Unscientific Explanations for Utterly Baffling Parenting Situations - cover

    Science of Parenthood -...

    Norine Dworkin-McDaniel, Jessica...

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    • The gift book market is booming: Perigee reports 2014 sales up 20 percent over 2013. Gift books also sell exceptionally well as impulse buys (with few returns) in brick-and-mortar stores. (Publishers Weekly) 
    • US Census statistics show that there are more than 85 million moms in the US everyone knows a parent/guardian who could use a good, quick laugh.
    • A 2011 survey done by the Cooperative supermarket chain in Great Britain found that parents have about 90 minutes of “free” time for themselves—and that reading books is one of the top things they miss doing most. 
    • Five of the top 15 books on the New York Times best-selling Family books list are hilarious, irreverent reads like this one.
    • TV shows like The Big Bang Theory, Myth Busters, and Outrageous Acts of Science, together with catalogs like ThinkGeek and Facebook pages like I F*cking Love Science, have made science hip, fun, and accessible to nonscientists of all ages.
    Show book
  • Not QUITE The Classics - cover

    Not QUITE The Classics

    Colin Mochrie

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Where the art of improvisation meets the art of literature.“Colin Mochrie is a comedic and creative force to be reckoned with. Therefore, this book is a literary force to be reckoned with. If you are too lazy for reckoning, just read this book and everything will work out nicely.” —Brad Sherwood“Colin Mochrie is devastatingly handsome, perilously smart, and smells like warm maple syrup. Step inside his hilarious and complex mind, and abandon all hope.” —Aisha TylerBased on the improv game First Line, Last Line, Colin Mochrie of Whose Line is it Anyway? fame, puts a unique spin on works of classic literature. Taking the first line and last line from classic books and poems, Colin recasts these familiar stories in his own trademark offbeat style:    A verbose coyote becomes the star of A TALE OF TWO CRITTERS    Ishmael is a struggling actor hunting for a good hair day in MOBY    A rainy day at home becomes a zombie-killing adventure in THE CAT AND MY DAD    Mighty Casey strikes out again in CASEY AT THE BARThese stories, and many more, prove that no literary masterpiece is too big, or too small, for the improvisational comedy treatment.“I adore Colin Mochrie. I think he is brilliant, so talented AND a dear sweet man. Also, he’s funny as well and a good kisser!” —Florence Henderson“I love Colin. I love his voice. I love his lips. I love his eyeballs. His pecs. And the rest of him. I’m going to Paris with him soon.” — Richard Simmons
    Show book
  • Best Ever Classroom Jokes - Because some of us never grow up - cover

    Best Ever Classroom Jokes -...

    Mike Haskins

    • 0
    • 10
    • 0
    What’s brown and sticky? A stick. Remember the jokes you told in the playground? The ones you annoyed your parents with for hours and hours? The ones you secretly still find hilarious? This book contains them all, and more. Clean enough for children but funny enough for adults, Best Ever Playground Jokes is packed full of the stupidest jokes ever told. What happens if you pass out after eating too much curry? You go into a korma. What’s red and bad for your teeth? A brick. Containing a mix of well-loved favourites and brand new, originally written jokes, this rib-tickling book is an essential read for big kids everywhere.
    Show book