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Dreaming of the Stars - In Love and War #2 - cover

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Dreaming of the Stars - In Love and War #2

Cora Buhlert

Publisher: Pegasus Pulp Publishing

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Summary

Even in a galaxy torn apart by war, the young still have dreams. 
On Rajipuri, a poor planet in the Empire of Worlds, Anjali Patel and her two younger sisters look up at the stars and dream of escaping the limitations of a traditional and rigidly stratified society. 
At the same time, in a camp for war orphans in the Republic of United Planets, Mikhail Grikov also looks up at the stars and dreams of escaping a life of pain and abuse. 
One day in the far future, they will meet and change the galaxy. But for now, they're merely dreaming of the stars… 
This is a prequel novelette of 8500 words or approx. 29 print pages to the "In Love and War" series, but may be read as a standalone.

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