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Old Guy - Superhero: The Complete Collection - cover

Old Guy - Superhero: The Complete Collection

William Trowbridge

Publisher: Red Hen Press

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Summary

“When has geezerhood been handled so appealingly? . . . A true American hero is born.” —Albert Goldbarth, National Book Critics Circle Award–winning author of Saving Lives    Meet Oldguy: your regular aging superhero whose powers have dwindled over the years, and whose very mechanics are seriously fizzling. In seriocomic misadventures, Oldguy valiantly attempts to continue his former heroism in a somewhat wry version of Faulknerian endurance, defeating his enemies time and again—if not through superhuman abilities, then at least by “outliving the sons-a-bitches.” With its comic book-style illustrations, Oldguy inhabits a space all to itself—not strictly a poetry collection, not quite a graphic novel, but a hybrid sure to delight.   “An exhilarating read that I didn’t want to put down except to laugh and to shake my seventy-eight-year-old head in admiration.” —Ron Koertge, author of Shakespeare Makes the Playoffs

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