Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
The Congo and Other Poems - cover

The Congo and Other Poems

Vachel Lindsay

Publisher: Good Press

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Vachel Lindsay's 'The Congo, and Other Poems' is a powerful collection of poems reflecting the poet's unique blend of modernist influences and traditional poetic forms. Lindsay's bold use of free verse and vivid imagery creates a sense of movement and rhythm throughout the collection, immersing readers in the sights and sounds of the poems. The themes of colonialism, racism, and cultural identity are prominent in 'The Congo,' a poem that both dazzles and disturbs with its forceful language and unsettling portrayal of Western imperialism in Africa. Lindsay's exploration of these heavy topics, combined with his distinctive poetic style, sets 'The Congo, and Other Poems' apart as a significant work in American poetry. Vachel Lindsay, known for his performance poetry and unique presentation style, had a deep passion for social justice and cultural diversity, which is reflected in his work. Lindsay's travels and interactions with various communities likely inspired the diverse range of voices and perspectives in 'The Congo, and Other Poems.' Through his poetry, Lindsay sought to challenge societal norms and provoke thought on important issues of his time. I recommend 'The Congo, and Other Poems' to readers interested in modernist poetry, social commentary, and exploring the intersection of art and activism. Lindsay's thought-provoking verses and innovative approach to poetry make this collection a must-read for anyone looking to engage with complex themes through the power of language.
Available since: 11/20/2019.
Print length: 144 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Cleopatra: I Am Fire and Air - cover

    Cleopatra: I Am Fire and Air

    Harold Bloom

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Cleopatra is one of the most famous women in history—and thanks to Shakespeare, one of the most intriguing personalities in literature. She is the lover of Marc Antony, defender of Egypt, and, perhaps most enduringly, a champion of life. Cleopatra is supremely vexing, tragic, and complex. She has fascinated readers and audiences for centuries and has been played by the greatest actresses of their time, from Elizabeth Taylor to Vivien Leigh to Janet Suzman to Judi Dench.Award-winning writer and beloved professor Harold Bloom writes about Cleopatra with wisdom, joy, exuberance, and compassion. He also explores his own personal relationship to the character: Just as we encounter one Anna Karenina or Jay Gatsby when we are in high school and college and another when we are adults, Bloom explains his shifting understanding of Cleopatra over the course of his own lifetime. The audiobook becomes an extraordinarily moving argument for literature as a path to and a measure of our own humanity.Bloom is mesmerizing in the classroom, wrestling with the often tragic choices Shakespeare's characters make. With Cleopatra, he delivers exhilarating clarity and invites us to look at this character as a flawed human who might be living in our world. The result is an invaluable resource from our greatest literary critic.
    Show book
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream - cover

    A Midsummer Night's Dream

    William Shakespeare

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Perhaps the most popular of all of Shakespeare's comedies, A Midsummer Night's Dream humorously celebrates the vagaries of love. The approaching wedding festivities of Theseus, Duke of Athens, and his bride-to-be, Hippolyta, Queen of the Amazons, are delightfully crisscrossed with in-again, off-again romances of two young pairs of Athenian lovers; a fateful rivalry between the King and Queen of the Fairies; and the theatrical aspirations of a bumbling troupe of Athenian laborers. It all ends happily in wedding-night revelry complete with a play-within-a-play presented by the laborers to the ecstatic amusement of all.
    Show book
  • The Confidential Clerk - cover

    The Confidential Clerk

    T.S. Eliot

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A comedy of mistaken identities erupts in the household of a wealthy London entrepreneur in this play by the Nobel Prize–winning author. 
     
    A motley play of family mysteries, The Confidential Clerk follows Sir Claude and Lady Elizabeth as they reconnect with their long-lost illegitimate children—even though they aren’t quite certain whose child is whose. “Extraordinarily good fun,” this is one of Eliot’s greatest comedies, full of wit, crisp dialogue, and parental hijinks laced with some of Eliot’s finest poetry and existential reveries (The Atlantic). 
     
    Praise for The Confidential Clerk 
     
    “The dialogue . . . has a precision and a lightly felt rhythm unmatched in the writing of any contemporary dramatist.” —Times Literary Supplement (UK) 
     
    “A triumph of dramatic skill: the handling of the two levels of the play is masterly and Eliot’s verse registers its greatest achievement on the stage—passages of great lyrical beauty are incorporated into the dialogue.” —Spectator (UK)
    Show book
  • Maskwork - cover

    Maskwork

    Gregory Leadbetter

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In Gregory Leadbetter's second poetry collection, Maskwork, mystery, theatre and ritual combine to reveal rather than to disguise. The mask, in these resonant poems, acts as a way of becoming, seeing, and knowing – granting access to altered states and otherworlds hidden within and beyond ourselves. Here, language itself becomes an animating magic, connecting humans to our ecological roots.
    The spirit of revival, renaissance, new birth and rebirth haunts this book: and at its core, the idea of poetry itself as a form of learning – an art and a mystery – runs like a quicksilver thread throughout, between the elusive and the certain. Leadbetter's meticulously attuned lyrical poetry tells of the transformative experience of knowing, a dynamic state of being that forever alters both the knower and the known.
    Show book
  • Plasticine (NHB Modern Plays) - cover

    Plasticine (NHB Modern Plays)

    Vassily Sigarev

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    An extraordinary and disturbing play about post-Communist Russia by a young Siberian-born writer.
    Evening Standard Award for Most Promising Playwright
    Anti-Booker Prize, Moscow
    In a faceless city in the depths of present-day Russia a young boy dies. Women in the street are drunk, fight and demand sex. Maksim, a schoolboy, makes his way through this urban hell. His only retreat is into a private world moulded by himself, out of which springs a final act of reckless courage.
    'Watching this impressive and disturbing howl of a play by the young Russian writer, Vassily Sigarev, is like taking a walk through a rough, druggy London scene after closing time... it has flashes of almost comic grotesquery, vividly communicates an alarming sense of contemporary urban Russia on the verge of anarchy and breakdown' - Evening Standard
    'This extraordinary play lasts only 75 minutes, but watching Dominic Cooke's brilliant production you feel you have been to hell and back. Plasticine offers a nightmarish trip to the lower depths of contemporary Russia, and the sheer power of the staging leaves you reeling' - Daily Telegraph
    Show book
  • Shakespeare Tales of Jealousy - cover

    Shakespeare Tales of Jealousy

    William Shakespeare, Edith Nesbit

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Shakespeare often uses expressive language in his portrayal of jealousy. It is a 'green-eyed monster', an object that 'one might fight and conquer', 'an infection which strikes as quickly as the plague'. 
    In this selection of Shakespeare stories, jealousy plays a prominent role, offering us a wonderful opportunity to learn how Shakespeare's characters are dealing with this vice. 
    The collection includes: 
    OthelloThe Two Gentlemen of VeronaTwelfth Night 
    Read in English, unabridged.
    Show book