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Wish You Were Here: Europe - cover

Wish You Were Here: Europe

Terry Stevens

Publisher: Graffeg Limited

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Summary

This book will give tourists and travellers a description of each of 50 leading destinations from around Europe with a personal explanation offering an insight as to why, and how, these destinations consistently deliver high-quality visitor experiences.

In addition to the 36 European destinations featured in Wish You Were Here, this European edition of the book also includes information on West Dorset (UK), Bergamo (Italy), Bordeaux (France), Brda (Slovenia), Vyoske Tatry (Slovakia), Cornwall (UK), San Sebastian (Spain), Podcetrek (Slovenia), Trieste (Italy), The Wadden Sea (Denmark), Cardiff (UK), Basel (Belgium), North Pembrokeshire (UK) and Valletta (Malta).

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