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Just Keep Swimming - A story of hope against anorexia - cover

Just Keep Swimming - A story of hope against anorexia

Stephanie Shott

Publisher: The Conrad Press

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Summary

Toxic. Unexplainable. Deadly. This is the reality of living with a mental illness. When your mind becomes your own killer, death seems like a sweet release. This gripping and heart-wrenching story reveals the brutal reality of life with an eating disorder.
Stephanie Shott is a bright and life-loving young woman who has had to deal with all the horror and difficulty of anorexia. In this moving and inspirational book, ‘Just Keep Swimming’, Stephanie bravely and boldly opens herself up to the reader and tells her story.  This harrowing story of dealing with anorexia and beating it is engrossing, disturbing and utterly inspirational.

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