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River House - Poems - cover

River House - Poems

Sally Keith

Publisher: Milkweed Editions

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Summary

“This heartbreaking and robust poetry collection . . . explores the complexity of the mind in the midst of grief” (Publishers Weekly, starred review). 
 
These are poems of absence. Written in the wake of the loss of her mother, River House follows Sally Keith as she makes her way through the depths of grief, navigating a world newly transfigured. 
 
Incorporating her travels abroad, her experience studying the neutral mask technique developed by Jacques Lecoq, and her return to the river house she and her mother often visited, the poet assembles a guide to survival in the face of seemingly insurmountable pain. Even in the dark, Keith finds the ways we can be “filled with this unexpected feeling of living.”
Available since: 04/21/2015.
Print length: 96 pages.

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