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Small-Town Slayings in South Carolina - cover

Small-Town Slayings in South Carolina

Rita Y. Shuler

Publisher: The History Press

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Summary

A former forensic photographer and author of Murder in the Midlands chronicles horrific killings that struck at the heart of the Palmetto State.   Ax assault, kidnapping, brutal murder: how could these things happen in a small town? Although regional crimes hardly ever make it to the national circuit, they will always remain with the families and communities of the victims and a part of the area’s history. After working with the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division as special agent/forensic photographer for twenty-four years, Rita Shuler has a passion for remembering the victims. In Small-town Slayings, Shuler takes us back in time, showing differences and similarities of crime solving in the past and present and some surprising twists of court proceedings, verdicts, and sentences. From an unsolved case that has haunted her for thirty years to a cold case that was solved after fifteen years by advanced DNA technology, Shuler blends her own memories with extensive research, resulting in a fast-paced, factual, and fascinating look at crime in South Carolina.   Includes photos!
Available since: 02/02/2009.
Print length: 163 pages.

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