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Palm Springs Holiday - cover

Palm Springs Holiday

Peter Moruzzi

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

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Summary

Explore the glamor and style of Palm Springs in its golden age with this gorgeously illustrated book of vintage photographs, postcards and other ephemera.   From the 1910s through the 1960s, Palm Springs, California, was a city that had it all, including marvelous midcentury Modern architecture, fabulous fly-in hotels, and a swinging nightlife. Featuring vintage images of the area’s famous hotels and gambling dens, as well as the Coachella Valley, Palm Springs Holiday tells the story of this legendary destination in its golden age.    Author and architectural historian Peter Moruzzi provides essential historical context as well as insightful and engaging commentary about a time when people vacationed in the desert, dining, dancing, and lounging poolside.
Available since: 09/01/2009.
Print length: 176 pages.

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