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Bull - cover

Bull

Mike Bartlett

Publisher: Nick Hern Books

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Summary

A razor-sharp, acid-tongued new play by Mike Bartlett, one of the UK's most exciting and inventive young writers.
Two jobs. Three candidates. This would be a really bad time to have a stain on your shirt...
Bull opened at Crucible Studio Theatre, Sheffield, in February 2013 in a Sheffield Theatres Production, directed by Clare Lizzimore.
'Sinewy, stinging, witty... it's as if Bartlett has taken the nastiest needling from a Mamet or a Pinter play and put them into a space of pure verbal aggression' The Times
'A writer with a startling breadth of ambition coupled with an ear for dialogue unmatched by many of his contemporaries... Bull taps into something incredibly relevant and potent' Exeunt Magazine
Available since: 02/28/2013.
Print length: 64 pages.

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