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The Kingdom of AIDS - cover

The Kingdom of AIDS

Marie-Louise Abia

Publisher: Éditions Dédicaces

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Summary

Father Baba received a few confessions from people suffering from AIDS and confined in an isolation centre, while awaiting their imminent death. From the nurse who carelessly inoculated the poison into the flesh of thousands of her patients, to the officer of the Congolese army who knew he was HIV positive but purposely had sex with thousands of young people to transmit them the virus as a revenge, and the western doctor who voluntarily enrolled as a humanitarian doctor in Africa to deliberately spread the virus among young African people – girls and boys, after he discovered he was HIV positive, Father Baba had heard all sorts of confessions from men and women who had decided to avenge themselves for having been contaminated with the HIV. Bound to keep secret any confession, he had never betrayed his commitment and observed silently the stunning propagation of the virus all over the country. But when the weight of the human conscience got the upper hand over his priestly obligations, a few hours before his death, he decided to break the Seal of Confession, disclosing the secrets and entrusting them to a publisher who, in turn, decided to make the confessions public, under the title of Welcome to the Kingdom of AIDS.

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