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Moral Letters to Lucilius - Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium - cover

Moral Letters to Lucilius - Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium

Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Translator Richard Mott Gummere

Publisher: e-artnow

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Summary

The Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, also known as the Moral Epistles, is a collection of 124 letters which were written by Seneca the Younger at the end of his life, during his retirement, and written after he had worked for the Emperor Nero for fifteen years. They are addressed to Lucilius, the then procurator of Sicily, although he is known only through Seneca's writings. Although these letters deal with Seneca's eclectic form of Stoic philosophy, they also give us valuable insights into daily life in ancient Rome.
Available since: 12/20/2023.
Print length: 724 pages.

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