Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Power Tool - In a Galaxy Far Far AwRy #6 - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have more than 1 million other books you can enjoy!

Power Tool - In a Galaxy Far Far AwRy #6

Liam Gibbs

Publisher: Liam Gibbs

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

The greatest power in the galaxy can see across timelines and he's really cranky. 
Master Asinine and his alliance of imbeciles, the Bad Guys, have located a source of great power, one they plan to use in their war against the Good Guys. Because Asinine has a one-track mind, and he loves his wars. And sausages. 
But when that source of great power turns out to be a living person—a reclusive Trioxidillian—things get uglier. Also snarkier. 
So now the Good Guys must make their move to stop the Bad Guys from acquiring this source of power and getting one step closer to total galactic domination. Not easy when Mechanism commences schemes of his own to wrest this power for his own evil deeds. 
Meanwhile, left alone at home, Legion falls victim when a mysterious figure from his past captures him for who knows what. Owie. 
Can Reef lead his team into the heart of the Bad Guys' own headquarters to rescue this Trioxidillian from both Master Asinine and Mechanism? Can Legion survive his captor's murderous plans? Will I shut up and let you read the book? Fine!

Other books that might interest you

  • Dearest Dacha - cover

    Dearest Dacha

    Norman Maclean

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “Perhaps the first Gaelic black comedy” from the renowned Scottish television entertainer, comedian, and writer (John Murray, RTE Radio 1).   Norman MacLean is a living legend in the Gaelic world. Based in the Uists in the Outer Hebrides, with side trips to Glasgow, Hamburg and Amsterdam, this dotty adventure embraces frustrated sex, drugs, eightsome reels and a memorable cast of oddball characters: three inept would-be criminals, a demented care-home resident, an ex-communicant of the Free Church of Scotland who moonlights as an enforcer, a pair of Russian weight-lifters who raise ostriches by day and mud-wrestle by night, and a formidable woman lawyer determined to cleanse the island of wrongdoing before HM The Queen arrives on her annual visit. Something akin to a mad Gaelic version of The Sopranos as directed by the Coen brothers, this novella is a masterclass of understatement, pitch-perfect dialogue and confident narration. “Norman is a 24-carat comedy jewel that just keeps sparkling.” —Bruce Morton, BBC Radio Scotland “Norman MacLean is the Billy Connolly of the Gaidhealtachd.” —Calum MacDonald, Runrig
    Show book
  • Thalia Book Club: Tessa Hadley Late In The Day - cover

    Thalia Book Club: Tessa Hadley...

    Tessa Hadley

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The acclaimed British novelist and short story master who "recruits admires with each book" (Hilary Mantel) discusses her latest novel with fellow author Colm Tóibín (House of Names). Ingeniously moving between past and present, Late in the Day exposes how infinite alternate configurations lie beneath the seemingly dependable arrangements we make for our lives. With a reading by Rita Wolf (An Ordinary Muslim).
    Show book
  • Sunbeams - cover

    Sunbeams

    George Wilbur Peck

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    George W. Peck was at times a writer, newspaper publisher and politician. Many of the Sunbeam essays had been published in Peck's paper, "The Sun", as amusing and often critical comments on social and political subjects, typically current in the beginning of the 1900's. Topics are often 'small town' United States, and Peck's gentle sarcasm or portrayals much resembles that of Twain.Listeners must be aware that the Spanish American War was a recent event, leading to the "Yankee" involvement in the Philippines. Admiral Dewey, who figures in several of the writings, had the Olympia as his flagship. The Dwight, mentioned in 'A Bear with a Jag', may have been Charles Dwight Sigsbee, Captain of the Maine in 1898. At this time the British Empire was in conflict with the Boers under Kruger, all topics of or mentioned in the early essays.In the slang of that time a "drummer" was a traveling salesman, while a trust was a financial combine with monopolistic powers. The essay title term "bimeatallic" likely is a take-off on the "bimetallic question", which referred to arguments over having gold and silver both as legal tender. Peck suggested, tongue in cheek, that there could be a 'standard' under which horsemeat should be disclosed as an ingredient of sausage. Indeed, many of the essays deal with questionable ingredients for foods, and were probably of high relevance to consumers who were without the regulatory protections and labelling requirements of today. In the same vein, the 'embalmed beef' served as rations to U.S. soldiers became notorious. (Summary by Arnold Banner)
    Show book
  • Zipper Mouth - A Novel - cover

    Zipper Mouth - A Novel

    Laurie Weeks

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    This novel of a young lesbian addict in ’90s NYC “recalls Naked Lunch” with “dreamy, impressionistic, and rapturous” prose—“an ecstatic love story” (Publishers Weekly).   Written in the brash, fervent voice of the young and addicted, this debut novel from underground superstar Laurie Weeks “is a short tome of infinitesimal reach, a tiny star to light the land” (Eileen Myles).   Strung out on dope and unrequited love for her straight best friend, Jane, the novel’s unnamed narrator zig-zags between glimpses of her childhood and early teens to the raw, super-caffeinated world of her present on the streets of New York. Chosen by Dave Eggers as Best American Nonrequired Reading and a winner of the 2012 Lambda Literary Awards, this novel encapsulates the soaring highs and gritty lows of the junkie and the reckless intensity of love. “The book’s pulse is evident on every page.” (Lambda Literary)   “Zipper Mouth is a brilliant rabbit hole of pitch-black hilarity, undead obsession, the horror of the everyday, and drug, drugs, drugs.” —Michelle Tea, co-founder of SisterSpit
    Show book
  • The Best a Man Can Get - A Novel - cover

    The Best a Man Can Get - A Novel

    John O'Farrell

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A hilarious and touching debut novel in the seriocomic Nick Hornby tradition.   Michael Adams is a composer of advertising jingles who shares a bachelor pad with three other guys. He spends his days lying in bed (a minifridge positioned perfectly within reach) and playing trivia games with his underachieving roommates. And when he feels like it, Michael crosses the city and returns home to his unsuspecting wife and two small children. Michael is living a double life, stretching out his wilting salad days with imaginary business trips and fake deadlines while his wife enjoys the exhausting misery of the little ones. It’s the best thing for his marriage, Michael figures. She can care for the new loves of her life as it seems only she knows how, and he can sleep until the afternoon. Can this double life continue indefinitely? In The Best a Man Can Get, best-selling comic novelist John O’Farrell takes readers on a dark romp through the soul of the contemporary male, torn between eternal adolescence and the very real demands of fatherhood. It’s wry, witty, and surprisingly charming.   “Sharp-witted slapstick.” —Publishers Weekly
    Show book
  • Mr Funny Pants - cover

    Mr Funny Pants

    Michael Showalter

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    I was at my wit's end.  I'd had enough of this job, this life, and my relationship had broken up.  Should I eat chocolate, or go to India, or fall in love?  Then I had a revelation: Why not do all three, in that order?  And so it was that I embarked on a journey that was segmented into three parts and was then made into a major motion picture.  Later, I woke up on an airplane with a hole in my face and a really bad hangover.  I was ushered brusquely off the plane by my parents who took me to a rehab where I tested positive for coke, classic coke, special k (the drug), Special K (the cereal), mushrooms, pepperoni, and Restless Leg Syndrome.  It was there that I first began painting with my feet. But rewind...the year was 1914.  I was just a young German soldier serving in the trenches while simultaneously trying to destroy an evil ring with some help from an elf, a troll, and a giant sorcerer, all while cooking every recipe out of a Julia Child cookbook. What I'm trying to say is that there was a secret code hidden in a painting and I was looking for it with this girl who had a tattoo of a dragon!  Let me clarify, it was the 1930s and a bunch of us were migrating out of Oklahoma, and I was this teenage wizard/CIA operative, okay?  And, um then I floated off into the meta-verse as a ball of invisible energy that had no outer edge... Ugh, okay.  None of this is true.  I'm just kind of a normal guy from New Jersey who moved to New York, got into comedy, wrote this book about trying to write this book, and then moved to Alaska, became the mayor of a small town, spent $30,000 on underwear, and now I'm going to rule the world!!!
    Show book