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Musings of a Baby Boomer - Life Before X Y and Z - cover

Musings of a Baby Boomer - Life Before X Y and Z

Kay Hoflander

Publisher: Brown Books Publishing Group

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Summary

An honest, humorous, and refreshing look back on the experiences of a unique generation and the challenges of growing older in the digital age.Musings of a Baby Boomer: Life Before X, Y, and Z is a collection of selected shorts from Hoflander’s weekly newspaper column “Full Circle,” featuring sometimes funny and sometimes philosophical stories with a continuous theme: the reluctant, but generally happy, aging of the Baby Boomer generation. In this collection, Hoflander tells stories about everything from yard flamingos and college move-in day to battling internet bots. She reflects on the simpler times of her childhood and addresses present-day changes to which, as a baby boomer, she adapts: memory loss, evolving technology, and politics. Through it all, she uses humor and wit to remind readers not to take life too seriously—and to focus on the things that really matter.“This book entails family, friends, and wisdom from the perspective of the baby boomer generation! A great read for all! Delightful.” —Teresa Parson, First Lady of Missouri“America needs healing, and instead of destroying our history, perhaps musings from those who have been part of history can provide a way forward. That is what Kay Hoflander's book offers.” —Lieutenant Colonel Allen B. West (US Army, Retired), Member, 112th U.S. Congress, Former Chairman, Republican Party of Texas“Hoflander has the magical skills to hit upon daily life with humor and understanding . . . For younger readers, this book just may help you better understand your parents or grandparents. It is a book for all generations to enjoy.” —Suzanne Skelly, University of Missouri Graduate Educator, Realtor, Genealogist and life-long Bibliophile
Available since: 04/26/2022.
Print length: 240 pages.

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