Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
7 best short stories - Loneliness - cover

7 best short stories - Loneliness

Katherine Mansfield, Ambrose Bierce, Anton Chekhov, Virginia Woolf, H. G. Wells, Joyce James, August Nemo

Publisher: Tacet Books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Loneliness has many faces - it can be a moment of sadness and the result of bad choices or some abandonment, but it can also arise as a gift for us to enjoy our own company, seize the silence and meditate on life.
The critic August Nemo has selected for this book seven short stories by great authors that explore the different ways of experiencing loneliness.
This book contains:

- Miss Brill by Katherine Mansfield.
- Vanka by Anton Chekhov.
- The Door in the Wall by H. G. Wells.
- Kew Gardens by Virginia Woolf.
- The Bet by Anton Chekhov.
- A Painful Case by James Joyce.
- The Boarded Window by Ambrose Bierce.
For more books with interesting themes, be sure to check the other books in this collection!

Other books that might interest you

  • Every City Is Every Other City - A Gordon Stewart Mystery - cover

    Every City Is Every Other City -...

    John McFetridge

    • 0
    • 3
    • 1
    Behind the scenes, nothing is what it seems.
    		 
    Gord Stewart, 40 years old, single, moved back into his sub­urban childhood home to care for his widowed father. But his father no longer needs care and Gord is stuck in limbo. He’s been working in the movie business as a location scout for years, and when there isn’t much filming, as a private eye for a security company run by ex-cops, OBC. When a fellow crew member asks him to find her missing uncle, Gord reluctantly takes the job. The police say the uncle walked into some dense woods in Northern Ontario and shot himself, but the man’s wife thinks he’s still alive.
    		 
    With the help of his movie business and OBC connections, Gord finds a little evidence that the uncle may be alive. Now Gord has two problems: what to do when he finds a man who doesn’t want to be found, and admitting that he’s getting invested in this job. For the first time in his life, Gord Stewart is going to have to leave the sidelines and get into the game. Even if it might get him killed.
    Show book
  • The Wolves of Savernake - A gripping medieval mystery from the bestselling author - cover

    The Wolves of Savernake - A...

    Edward Marston

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Ralph Delchard, a soldier who fought at the Battle of Hastings, and Gervase Bret, a talented lawyer, have been commissioned by William the Conqueror to look into irregularities brought to light during the compilation of the Domesday Book, the great survey of  England. Their investigations take them throughout the kingdom, but the pair often find themselves embroiled in more sinister mysteries in the towns they visit. The King’s work is a dangerous business. 
    A man’s body is found mutilated in Savernake Forest and the residents of Bedwyn sleep uneasy at night, fearing a monster stalking the town. When Ralph Delchard and Gervase Bret arrive, they soon discover that the locals are harbouring dark secrets and that the real killer may be a little closer to home…
    Show book
  • An I-Novel - cover

    An I-Novel

    Minae Mizumura

    • 3
    • 4
    • 1
    Minae Mizumura’s An I-Novel is a semi-autobiographical work that takes place over the course of a single day in the 1980s. Minae is a Japanese expatriate graduate student who has lived in the United States for two decades but turned her back on the English language and American culture. After a phone call from her older sister reminds her that it is the twentieth anniversary of their family’s arrival in New York, she spends the day reflecting in solitude and over the phone with her sister about their life in the United States, trying to break the news that she has decided to go back to Japan and become a writer in her mother tongue.Published in 1995, this formally daring novel radically broke with Japanese literary tradition. It liberally incorporated English words and phrases, and the entire text was printed horizontally, to be read from left to right, rather than vertically and from right to left. In a luminous meditation on how a person becomes a writer, Mizumura transforms the “I-novel,” a Japanese confessional genre that toys with fictionalization. An I-Novel tells the story of two sisters while taking up urgent questions of identity, race, and language. Above all, it considers what it means to write in the era of the hegemony of English—and what it means to be a writer of Japanese in particular. Juliet Winters Carpenter masterfully renders a novel that once appeared untranslatable into English.
    Show book
  • Apartment - cover

    Apartment

    Teddy Wayne

    • 1
    • 6
    • 1
    A New York Times Editors Choice 
    Longlisted for the 2020 Simpson / Joyce Carol Oates Literary Prize 
    One of Vogue.com's “Best Books of 2020 So Far” 
    One of Elle's “Best Books of 2020 So Far” 
     
    Named A Most-Anticipated Book by The New York Times, Vogue, The Boston Globe, Salon,  
     The Millions, Inside Hook, and Vol. 1 Brooklyn 
     
    In 1996, the unnamed narrator of Teddy Wayne's Apartment is attending the MFA writing program at Columbia on his father's dime and living in an illegal sublet of a rent-stabilized apartment. Feeling guilty about his good fortune, he offers his spare bedroom--rent-free--to Billy, a talented, charismatic classmate from the Midwest eking out a hand-to-mouth existence in Manhattan. 
     
    The narrator's rapport with Billy develops into the friendship he's never had due to a lifetime of holding people at arm's length, hovering at the periphery, feeling “fundamentally defective.” But their living arrangement, not to mention their radically different upbringings, breeds tensions neither man could predict. Interrogating the origins of our contemporary political divide and its ties to masculinity and class, Apartment is a gutting portrait of one of New York's many lost, disconnected souls by a writer with an uncommon aptitude for embodying them.
    Show book
  • Del Rio - A Novel - cover

    Del Rio - A Novel

    Jane Rosenthal

    • 1
    • 3
    • 1
    Del Rio, California, a once-thriving Central Valley farm town, is now filled with run-down Dollar Stores, llanterias, carnicerias, and shabby mini-marts that sell one-way bus tickets straight to Tijuana on the Flecha Amarilla line. It’s a place you drive through with windows up and doors locked, especially at night—a place the locals call Cartel Country. While it’s no longer the California of postcards, for local District Attorney Callie McCall, her dying hometown is the perfect place to launch a political career and try to make a difference.But when the dismembered body of a migrant teen is found in one of Del Rio’s surrounding citrus groves, Callie faces a career make-or-break case that takes her on a dangerous journey down the violent west coast of Mexico, to a tropical paradise hiding a terrible secret, and finally back home again, where her determination to find the killer pits her against the wealthiest, most politically connected, most ruthless farming family in California: her own.
    Show book
  • For Better For Worse - Domestic noir meets police procedural in this gripping page-turner - cover

    For Better For Worse - Domestic...

    Jane Isaac

    • 1
    • 8
    • 0
    'Jane Isaac knows how to tell a good yarn. Expertly plotted and true to life' Mel Sherratt. 
     
    Stuart Ingram was once a respected local councillor... 
     
    The first time the police knocked on Gina's door, they arrested her husband. 
     
    The second time, they accused him of child abuse. 
     
    But he died a guilty man. 
     
    This time, the police are here for Gina – to tell her that her husband is dead. Murdered, just two weeks before his trial. 
     
    Gina always stood by her husband. Even when everyone else walked away. She believed the trial would clear his name. But now Stuart is dead. 
     
    And his wife is the suspect. 
     
    It's a race against time for DC Beth Chamberlain to uncover the truth – especially when a second man turns up dead. 
     
    Domestic noir meets police procedural in this pacy thriller from Jane Isaac, perfect for fans of Samantha Downing, Fiona Barton and K.L. Slater. Previously published as Presumed Guilty. 
     
    Praise for Jane Isaac: 
     
    'Gripping subjects, brilliantly drawn characters and a twisty turny journey from beginning to end. A tense, thrilling read and definitely 5 humongous ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ from me' Angela Marsons on Hush Little Baby. 
     
    'Isaac does a superb job of escalating the tension and dread' Publishers Weekly. 
     
    'Move over La Plante...' Susan May, Suspense Magazine. 
     
    'Tense, dark and gritty: perfect combination' Ian Patrick, author of Rubicon. 
     
    'Crime writing at its best' David Evans, CWA Debut Dagger-shortlisted author of Torment. 
     
    'Jane Isaac just gets better with every book. Deeply unsettling and unputdownable' Rebecca Bradley, bestselling author of the DI Hannah Robbins series. 
     
    'Jane Isaac writes unmissable quality crime fiction' Michael Wood, author of For Reasons Unknown. 
     
    'Gripped from the very first page ... and just when you think it's over, it's really only the beginning' June Taylor, author of Losing Juliet. 
     
    'Brilliantly and intricately plotted, Jane Isaac has produced a terrific page-turner' Lizzie Sirett, Mystery People.
    Show book