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Stepping Beyond Khaki - Revelations of a Real-Life Singham - cover

Stepping Beyond Khaki - Revelations of a Real-Life Singham

K Annamalai

Publisher: Bloomsbury India

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Summary

How did the rape and murder of a young girl transform a rule-obsessed officer to take on a more humane approach? 
  
Why did people start calling him Singham just a few years into his policing career? 
  
What is it that made a shy, simple village boy dedicate himself to a lifetime of commitment towards public service? 
 
Stepping Beyond Khaki: Revelations of a Real-Life Singham is a tell-all memoir by celebrated former police officer K. Annamalai. With a career spanning a decade in the state of Karnataka, he earned the respect of the people with his humanistic action and his style of leadership focusing on empowering subordinates. Further, Annamalai pitches significant questions that rarely get discussed-are politicians bad? And is politics a place where good people fear to tread?  
 
By stepping away from the spotlight and bringing out the real heroes whom he had encountered in his policing journey, this is unlike any other policing memoir. Truthfully told with a dash of idealism, it also prescribes changes that are much needed in politics, policing and in our daily governance mechanisms. It brings out the inherent goodness of the common man and the role the general public play in keeping this democracy functioning.

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