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sonnets from the singlish: upsize edition - cover

sonnets from the singlish: upsize edition

Joshua Ip

Publisher: Math Paper Press

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Summary

Co-winner of the 2014 Singapore Literature Prize — Poetry 
 
sonnets from the singlish is a collection of 88 poems on love, language and the pursuit of laughter. the poems are loosely translated from the english-based creole language colloquially spoken in singapore, widely known as singlish. 
 
the poems were originally composed in the sonnet form, an archaic italian fourteen-line rhyming verse form that follows the rhythmic rules of iambic pentameter. people still write like this primarily for ease of formatting. they are most tolerable when read out loudly in a singaporean accent.
Available since: 05/06/2022.
Print length: 58 pages.

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