Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Freeman's: Love - cover

Freeman's: Love

John Freeman

Publisher: Grove Press

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

New work from Tommy Orange, Anne Carson, Louise Erdrich, and others propels this tribute to love from Freeman’s, “a powerful force in the literary world” (Los Angeles Times). 
 
In a time of contentiousness and flagrant abuse, it often feels as if our world is run on hate. Invective. Cruelty and sadism. But is it possible the greatest and most powerful force is love? In the newest issue of this acclaimed series, Freeman’s: Love asks this question, bringing together literary heavyweights like Tommy Orange, Anne Carson, Louise Erdrich, and Nobel Prize winner Olga Tokarczuk alongside emerging writers such as Gunnhild Øyehaug and Semezdin Mehmedinovic. 
 
Mehmedinovic contributes a breathtaking book-length essay on the aftermath of his wife’s stroke, describing how the two reassembled their lives outside their home country of Bosnia. Richard Russo’s charming and painful “Good People” introduces us to two sets of married professors who have been together for decades, and for whom love still exists, but between the wrong pair. Haruki Murakami tells the tale of a one-night stand that feels like a dying sun. 
 
Together, the pieces comprise a stunning exploration of the complexities of love, tracing it from its earliest stirrings, to the forbidden places where it emerges against reason, to loss so deep it changes the color of perception. In a time when we need it the most, this issue promises what only love can bring: a solace of complexity and warmth. 
 
“The anthology packs an emotional wallop from the start.” —Shelf Awareness
Available since: 10/13/2020.
Print length: 320 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • The Earl Warder and the Wayward Heiress - cover

    The Earl Warder and the Wayward...

    J. S. Fletcher

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Joseph Smith Fletcher (1863 – 1935) was a British journalist and author. He wrote more than 230 books on a wide variety of subjects, both fiction and non-fiction. He was one of the leading writers of detective fiction in the Victorian "Golden Age" of the short story."The Earl, the Warder and the Wayward Heiress" is the story of a ten-thousand-pound bet between young gentlemen in their club. The Earl of Normanstowe undertakes to walk out of the club at eight o'clock that evening, and given a sixteen hour start, to disappear for the period of exactly one month without leaving London.Sir Charles Wrigge undertakes to track him down within the month. Normanstowe's plan for his concealment is certainly novel... but the outcome of his adventure is anything but what he expected.
    Show book
  • Deep Black Sea - cover

    Deep Black Sea

    David M. Salkin

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “Science fiction at its best, a realistic tale of exploration and danger, written by a man who knows the details of deep-sea exploration firsthand.” —Ben Bova, Hugo Award-wining author 
     
    With a crew of seven, the Challenger sea lab submerges three miles below the waves for a one-year mission to study the hidden world of the deep black sea. How is it that sea animals can live and reproduce in water that should boil them on the thermal vents known as “black smokers?” Superheated water that is full of toxins and heavy metals and contains almost no oxygen should be void of life on planet Earth—and yet it is teeming with it. The answer to the puzzle lies in the bacteria. 
     
    Researcher Ted Bell is a NASA scientist with his own agenda: getting humans to Mars. When he purposefully infects a member of the crew in an attempt to harness the power of the Deinococcus radiodurans bacteria, he quickly loses control and unleashes a terrifying new creature. His botched experiment quickly becomes a battle for survival—three miles below the surface.  
     
    With the research vessel nearing catastrophic failure, and terrifying alien life forms running wild through the ship, the crew must figure out a way to battle something that is no longer human while trying desperately to reach the surface alive.  
     
    “Crichton at his best is the main author who comes to mind as a comparable influence when reading Deep Black Sea . . . The informative and fascinating science that fills each page really elevates this book to a higher grade.” —Horror Novel Reviews
    Show book
  • For You To See The Stars - cover

    For You To See The Stars

    Radney Foster

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Legendary singer/songwriter Radney Foster narrates the audiobook version of his first collection of short fiction.  
    Known for his literary approach to country music (as well as for penning dozens of top-10 hits for both himself and Nashville's elite), Foster felt driven to tell stories longer than the three minutes allowed for radio. For You to See the Stars is a testament to his talent, revealing the diversity of his voice, bringing lyrical prose to the listeners, and presenting Radney Foster to a whole new audience.
    Show book
  • True Loaf - cover

    True Loaf

    L. Austen Johnson

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A fun and enchanting modern fairytale. 
    When a strange man puts in a strange request at the bakery where she works, Riley must go on a mini-adventure to find one unusual ingredient. Along the way, she realizes that things are not always what they seem and that fae might just be real. A micro-story. 
    To celebrate paperless reading experiences and the magic of the Whisper Wood, the author has partnered with One Tree Planted. For every audiobook sold within the first year from release, one tree in North America shall be planted.
    Show book
  • The Thing in the Upper Room - cover

    The Thing in the Upper Room

    Arthur Morrison

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Arthur George Morrison (1863-1945) was an English writer and journalist known for his realistic novels and stories about working-class life.'The Thing in the Upper Room' is a classic Victorian horror story. Poor young English artist Attwater is delighted to find an oddly cheap top-floor room to rent in an old house in Paris. The room, as he is aware, has a reputation for being haunted. But what the nature of the haunting is, nobody seems to know - the place has been let only once in living memory owing to its reputation, and that tenant had committed suicide at the point where the police were breaking down his door to arrest him for murder. But Attwater could not possibly conceive the terrifying nature of the spirit that inhabits that unsettling room at the top of the stairs.
    Show book
  • Gold Rings - Seasonal Sparkles - cover

    Gold Rings - Seasonal Sparkles

    Mo Fanning

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Welcome to 'Gold Rings,' a collection of four evocative short stories from Mo Fanning's acclaimed collection 'Five Gold Rings.' Each tale, narrated by a different voice, transports you through the seasons, unfolding a tapestry of human emotions and experiences. And if Christmas is just a little too jolly, let Mo change your mind.
    Show book