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Bartleby the Scrivener - A Story of Wall-Street - cover

Bartleby the Scrivener - A Story of Wall-Street

Herman Melville

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

The classic tale of existential despair A Wall Street lawyer specializing in bonds and mortgages hires a respectable young man to copy legal documents by hand. At first, the new scrivener approaches his duties with a calm efficiency. Then comes the day when his response to a new assignment is, “I would prefer not to.” The mysterious phrase soon becomes Bartleby’s reply to everything asked of him, and his surrender to inertia is both maddening and inexorable. Torn between frustration and pity, anger and sorrow, his employer desperately tries to save Bartleby, but the cause is as doomed to disappointment as life itself. A strange and haunting fable that continues to resonate a century and a half after it was first published, Bartleby, the Scrivener is a masterpiece of American literature. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.
Available since: 08/26/2014.
Print length: 40 pages.

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