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The Gilded Age of Sport 1945–1960 - cover

The Gilded Age of Sport 1945–1960

Herbert Warren Wind

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

From gridiron to diamond, lawn to green, a legendary sportswriter captures the wins, losses, and draws of an exciting period in American sports history Throughout his long and distinguished career, Herbert Warren Wind covered many of the most dramatic contests and iconic athletes of the twentieth century. Inspired by Paul Gallico’s classic dispatches from the golden age of the 1920s and ’30s, The Gilded Age of Sport collects Wind’s finest pieces on the people and places of the postwar era.   With graceful prose and an authoritative eye for the telling detail, he profiles sports heroes including Yogi Berra, Ben Hogan, Maurice Richard, Bob Cousy, Sam Snead, Ted Williams, Herb Elliott, and Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman. Wind reveals Rocky Marciano’s training regimen, journeys as far afield as Japan and Australia to report on the international sports scene, and delights in the startling discrepancy between the woeful record of Harvard’s football team and the glory of its marching band.   An elegant and comprehensive survey of fifteen thrilling years in sports history, The Gilded Age of Sport is a testament to the versatility, wit, and wisdom of a master craftsman.  
Available since: 01/26/2016.
Print length: 478 pages.

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