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Three souls for a heart My polygamy - cover

Three souls for a heart My polygamy

Guillermina Mekuy

Publisher: MK Voces Femeninas

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Summary

This book tells us several stories, which have a real basis and are embedded in the determining elements of life: love, affection, the desire for liberation and change, acceptance, the struggle for life and the need to understand desire, sexuality…
It seems a lot for a single book, but there are books capable of going beyond simple storytelling and contain a baggage of knowledge that helps us reflect.
Three souls for a heart (My polygamy) is, therefore, a very important book that can also captivate us. And it does, not only for what it is said, but also for how the writer does it. For the original way of transferring the stories of his characters, his four main characters: Melba, Zulema, Aysha and Santiago Nvé, as well as a fifth character, the journalist Rita Maldonado, who is a transcript of the author herself and that carries the narrative thread of the book. A book that, in addition to discovering the world of polygamy, gets us excited. Is there anything more beautiful than emotion and thought blending together? Three souls for one heart does it for you.
And it does it from a liberating point of view. Because every human being, and even more women these days, struggle to occupy their space; claiming their role in the world.
“Is there a single type of love or several types? Is love a feeling or also a cultural element? I believe that love participates in both dimensions. And that is why it is so varied and we cannot generalize. That is why there are different forms of relationship and social organization of love relationships, depending on the cultures and the place in the world where they were born”.
Three souls for a heart (My polygamy) is an exciting and peculiar story of three women and one man, different in their culture and education, but all with a common denominator: they want to understand, they want to love. And something that adds even more importance to the extraordinary literary and sociological value of this wonderful book: the real characters behind its pages have the courage to let us discover their experiences and thoughts so that we all learn to look deeply into tolerance in the back of our souls: That which all human beings who share the incredible adventure of living have.

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