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Sonnets and Ballate of Guido Cavalcanti - cover

Sonnets and Ballate of Guido Cavalcanti

Guido Cavalcanti

Translator Ezra Pound

Publisher: DigiCat

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Summary

Guido Cavalcanti's 'Sonnets and Ballate' is a collection of his profound and thought-provoking poems that delve into themes of unrequited love, philosophical inquiry, and introspection. Written in the style of Dolce Stil Novo, these sonnets and ballate showcase Cavalcanti's mastery of complex rhyme schemes and deep emotional resonance, making them a timeless contribution to Italian literature. Situating himself within the literary context of the 13th century, Cavalcanti's work stands out for its intellectual depth and poetic ingenuity. With each carefully crafted verse, Cavalcanti invites readers to contemplate the complexities of human relationships and the mysteries of existence, leaving a lasting impact on those who engage with his work. Guido Cavalcanti, known for his close association with Dante Alighieri and his notable contributions to the Italian poetical tradition, brings unparalleled insight and sophistication to his 'Sonnets and Ballate'. Renowned for his intellectual prowess and poetic prowess, Cavalcanti's exploration of love and metaphysics elevates his work to a level of literary excellence that continues to resonate with readers today. For lovers of Italian poetry and those seeking to explore the depths of human experience, 'Sonnets and Ballate' is a must-read that offers both intellectual stimulation and emotional depth, solidifying Cavalcanti's legacy in the world of literature.
Available since: 08/10/2022.
Print length: 26 pages.

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