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The Laws of the Skies - cover

The Laws of the Skies

Gregoire Courtois

Translator Rhonda Mullins

Publisher: Coach House Books

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Summary

Winnie-the-Pooh meets The Blair Witch Project in this very grown-up tale of a camping trip gone horribly awry. 
Twelve six-year-olds and their three adult chaperones head into the woods on a camping trip. None of them make it out alive. The Laws of the Skies tells the harrowing story of those days in the woods, of illness and accidents, and a murderous child. 
Part fairy tale, part horror film, this macabre fable takes us through the minds of all the members of this doomed party, murderers and murdered alike.
Available since: 05/07/2019.
Print length: 152 pages.

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