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Jerusalem Explored (Vol 1&2) - Illustrated Edition - cover

Jerusalem Explored (Vol 1&2) - Illustrated Edition

Ermete Pierotti

Translator T. G. Bonney

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

In 'Jerusalem Explored' volumes 1 and 2, Ermete Pierotti masterfully explores the intricate history, geography, and culture of Jerusalem. Through detailed descriptions and vivid imagery, Pierotti brings to life the ancient city and its significant landmarks, providing readers with a comprehensive understanding of Jerusalem's significance in various historical contexts. The book is written in a scholarly yet accessible style, making it suitable for both academics and general history enthusiasts alike. Pierotti's meticulous attention to detail and thorough research make this a valuable resource for anyone interested in the history of Jerusalem. Ermete Pierotti, a renowned archaeologist and historian, brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to 'Jerusalem Explored.' His background in archaeology and his passion for history are evident in the depth of research and analysis present in the book. Pierotti's dedication to preserving and sharing the history of Jerusalem shines through in every chapter, making this work a valuable contribution to the field of historical literature. I highly recommend 'Jerusalem Explored' to anyone looking to delve deeper into the rich history of Jerusalem. Pierotti's thorough exploration of the city provides valuable insights and perspectives that will enrich the reader's understanding of this ancient and culturally significant place.
Available since: 12/16/2023.
Print length: 524 pages.

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