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Great American Poets - New Hampshire Tender Buttons Select Poems and Selected Poems - cover

Great American Poets - New Hampshire Tender Buttons Select Poems and Selected Poems

Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Gertrude Stein, T. S. Eliot

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

These four timeless poetry collections showcase the pioneering work of some of America’s most beloved and influential poets.  New Hampshire by Robert Frost: This Pulitzer Prize–winning collection features some of Frost’s most enduring works, all inspired by the cold and wild New Hampshire winter. Along with the title poem, this volume includes “Fire and Ice,” “Nothing Gold Can Stay,” and “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” which Frost himself called “my best bid for remembrance.”  Tender Buttons by Gertrude Stein: Stein’s first published work of poetry, this avant-garde meditation on ordinary living is presented in three sections: “Objects,” “Food,” and “Rooms.” Emphasizing rhythm and sonority over traditional grammar, Stein’s wordplay has garnered praise from readers and critics alike.  Selected Poems by T. S. Eliot: This twenty-four poem volume is a rich collection of Eliot’s greatest works—including “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” “Gerontion,” “Sweeny Among the Nightingales,” and others—all of which expertly explore the desires, grievances, failures, and heart of modern humanity.  Selected Poems by Emily Dickinson: This collection of poems by “one of America’s greatest and most original poets of all time” includes some of Dickinson’s best-known works, reflecting her thoughts on nature, life, death, the mind, and the spirit (Poetry Foundation).

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