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How to Get Rid of Bed Bugs - Recognize and Eliminate Bed Bugs - cover

How to Get Rid of Bed Bugs - Recognize and Eliminate Bed Bugs

David Reese

Publisher: RWG Publishing

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Summary

If the question occurs to you after waking up one morning with multiple itchy areas on your body, the likelihood is that you were bitten by bed bugs during the night.

So, what are bed bugs? To address the uncomfortable topic, bed bugs are simply insects. However, bed bugs, like the millions of other insect species, have their unique individuality. They would not be forgotten in the department of identification.
 
Begin with a scientific perspective. Cimex lectularius is the scientific name for bed bugs. They are members of the ever-expanding and diverse kingdom, or phylum, of Insecta.
 
Did you know that if the world ever comes to an end, all things on Earth, including humans and animals, will be annihilated? By that time, all but one sort of creature will have vanished.
 
You are correct. Insects will be permitted to occupy the earth due to their adaptability and resilience. Among them are bed bugs. That is why eradicating them will be a difficult task.
 

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