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After the End - Stories of Life After the Apocalypse - cover

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After the End - Stories of Life After the Apocalypse

Cora Buhlert

Publisher: Pegasus Pulp Publishing

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Summary

When the apocalypse has come and gone, life still goes on for the survivors struggling to adapt to the new normal. 
In a drowned world, the descendants of surface dwellers remember the cities that were lost, the inhabitants of ocean floor colonies cling to outmoded customs and scavengers search the flooded ruins for anything that might be of use. In a world ravaged by droughts, two college students come face to face with how the other half lives. A lone explorer traverses the icy wasteland that used to be Europe. A group of children travels across a zombie-infested America in search of shelter and safety. After a robot uprising, a police officer is assigned to clean-up duties and finds an unexpected miracle among the ruins. And in a world blasted by electromagnetic solar storms, a nineteenth century technology suddenly becomes the sole means of long distance communication. 
This collection contains eight stories of life after the apocalypse of 24500 words or approximately 85 print pages altogether. 

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