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Light Shining in Buckinghamshire (NHB Modern Plays) - cover

Light Shining in Buckinghamshire (NHB Modern Plays)

Caryl Churchill

Publisher: Nick Hern Books

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Summary

Caryl Churchill's Light Shining in Buckinghamshire, set during the English Civil War, tells the story of the men and women who went into battle for the soul of England. Passionate, moving and provocative, it speaks of the revolution we never had and the legacy it left behind.
In the aftermath of the Civil War, England stands at a crossroads. Food shortages, economic instability, and a corrupt political system threaten to plunge the country into darkness and despair.
The Parliament men who fought against the tyranny of the King now argue for stability and compromise, but the people are hungry for change.
For a brief moment, a group of rebels, preachers, soldiers and dissenters dare to imagine an age of hope, a new Jerusalem in which freedom will be restored to the land.
Premiered at the Royal Court Theatre, London, in 1976, the play was revived at the National Theatre in 1996 and again in 2015, in a production directed by Lyndsey Turner.
Available since: 04/16/2014.
Print length: 80 pages.

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