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The Olive Farm - A Memoir of Life Love and Olive Oil in the South of France - cover

The Olive Farm - A Memoir of Life Love and Olive Oil in the South of France

Carol Drinkwater

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

This memoir of buying and transforming an abandoned olive farm “describes life in the South of France with lush, voluptuous appreciation” (Publishers Weekly). Presented with an opportunity to purchase a ten-acre property near Cannes, actress Carol Drinkwater and her film-producer fiancé, Michel, decide to take the plunge. It will take all their savings just for the down payment, but the beauty of the surrounding countryside and the promise of a new adventure seem worth the risk. As they work to clear the weeds and rehabilitate the abandoned farm, they meet Provence’s quirky locals, puzzle through France’s legal bureaucracy, explore the nearby Mediterranean islands, and encounter the region’s wildlife. This colorful memoir from the Sunday Times–bestselling author recounts one couple’s remarkable journey from being inspired but inexperienced new landowners to realizing their dream of a fulfilling, peaceful life on their own little plot of paradise. “Good-humored and well-written.” —The Washington Post “A fantasy come true, as it will be for many of the readers who yearn to experience the magic of southern France.” —The Austin Chronicle
Available since: 10/11/2022.
Print length: 330 pages.

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