Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
And what about Human Rights? - The West's Policy on the Middle East Needs to Be Credible - cover

And what about Human Rights? - The West's Policy on the Middle East Needs to Be Credible

Bahman Nirumand

Translator Alfred Clayton

Publisher: edition Körber-Stiftung

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Bahman Nirumand has witnessed historical events from an eastern and a western perspective, and he is at home somewhere between the two. He is a refugee from the Middle East and an advocate of democracy and human rights, and he is now asking the West to be consistent. He believes that for the foreseeable future its insistence on realpolitik has deprived it of credibility, and that it is ironic that, in order to protect their interests, the proponents of human rights have for a long time been willing to support tyrants. This has incited a great deal of hatred in the Muslim world. And, more to the point, the Europeans and Americans are throwing away an opportunity to champion their values.

That is why the West is unable to come to terms with the Arab Spring in general and the civil war in Syria in particular. How is it possible at one and the same time to insist on the importance of democracy, to impose punitive sanctions, and to continue to give staunch support to Saudi Arabia's feudal masters?

Nirumand calls on Europe and the United States to bring their Middle East policies into line with their own stated values. The region can be stabilized only if the West systematically supports groups which are in favour of democracy.
Available since: 02/13/2013.

Other books that might interest you

  • Voodoo Histories - The Role of the Conspiracy Theory in Shaping Modern History - cover

    Voodoo Histories - The Role of...

    David Aaronovitch

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Our age is obsessed by the idea of conspiracy. We see it everywhere-from Pearl Harbor to 9/11, from the assassination of Kennedy to the death of Diana. In this age of terrorism we live in, the role of conspiracy is a serious one-one that can fuel radical or fringe elements to violence.For award-winning journalist David Aaronovitch, there came a time when he started to see a pattern among these inflammatory theories. He found that these theories used similarly murky methods with which to insinuate their claims: they linked themselves to the supposed conspiracies of the past ("it happened then so it can happen now"); they carefully manipulated their evidence to hide its holes; and they relied on the authority of dubious academic sources. Most important, they elevated their believers to membership of an elite-a group of people able to see beyond lies to a higher reality. But why believe something that entails stretching the bounds of probability so far? Surely it is more likely that men did actually land on the moon in 1969 than that thousands of people were enlisted to fabricate an elaborate hoax.In this entertaining and enlightening book-aimed at providing ammunition for those who have found themselves at the wrong end of a conversation about moon landings or the twin towers-Aaronovitch carefully probes and explodes a dozen of the major conspiracy theories. In doing so, he examines why people believe them and makes an argument for a true skepticism-one based on a thorough knowledge of history and a strong dose of common sense.
    Show book
  • A Macat Analysis of Robert Dahl's Democracy and Its Critics - cover

    A Macat Analysis of Robert...

    Astrid Norén-Nilsson, Elizabeth...

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Democracy and Its Critics is a modern classic that integrates Robert A. Dahl’s democratic thinking as it developed over the course of his academic career. It makes an important contribution to theories about democracy, and remains widely cited and debated.
    
    Dahl offers an interpretation of democratic theory and practice that is relevant to the modern world and that pays special attention to the problems highlighted by people who criticize democracy. By rigorously testing the basic assumptions of what a democracy is against the challenges posed by these critics, the work recasts our understanding of democracy and outlines the future directions Dahl believes democracy should take.
    
    Published in 1989, Democracy and its Critics won the 1990 Woodrow Wilson Prize awarded by the American Political Science Association, and the 1991 Elaine and David Spitz Book Award given by the International Conference for the Study of Political Thought.
    Show book
  • Six by Ten - Stories from Solitary - cover

    Six by Ten - Stories from Solitary

    Mateo Hoke, Taylor Pendergrass

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Thirteen personal accounts of solitary confinement’s devastating impact in the United States criminal justice system. 
     
    Six by ten feet. That’s the average size of the cells in which tens of thousands of people incarcerated in the United States linger for weeks, months, and even decades in solitary confinement. With little stimulation and no meaningful human contact, these individuals struggle to preserve their identity, sanity, and even their lives. In thirteen intimate narratives, Six by Ten explores the mental, physical, and spiritual impacts of America’s widespread embrace of solitary confinement. Through stories from those subjected to solitary confinement, family members on the outside, and corrections officers, Six by Ten examines the darkest hidden corners of America’s mass incarceration culture and illustrates how solitary confinement inflicts lasting consequences on families and communities far beyond prison walls. Stories include those of Brian, who was shuttled from prison to prison across Illinois as part of an unofficial program that came to be known as “the circuit”; Heather, a mother fighting for the life of her son, Nikko, who was diagnosed as bipolar at a young age and sent to solitary as a teenager; and Sonya, a trans woman sent to solitary in a men’s jail in Texas, supposedly for her own protection. 
     
    Praise for Six by Ten 
     
    “A consistently eye-opening, urgent report on the use and misuse of prisoner isolation.” —Kirkus Reviews 
     
    “Compels change by giving a voice to the voiceless . . . . The stories stop you in your tracks, but the appendices help move progress forward with simplicity, depth, and hope, beginning with ten things anyone can do that are impactful and accessible. The educational pieces of the book give apt background on the history and usage of solitary confinement, allowing even those examining the practice for the first time to have a firm grasp of the situation.” —Foreword Reviews 
     
    “A deeply moving and profoundly unsettling wake up call for all citizens. The use of solitary confinement is deeply immoral and we must insist that it be banned in all of our nation’s prisons. Immediately.” —Heather Ann Thompson, Pulitzer Prize–winning author, Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy
    Show book
  • John Wilkes - The Scandalous Father of Civil Liberty - cover

    John Wilkes - The Scandalous...

    Arthur H. Cash

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Pulitzer Prize Finalist: A biography of the wildly colorful eighteenth-century British politician who became “the toast of American revolutionaries” (Booklist).   One of the most colorful figures in English political history, John Wilkes (1726–97) is remembered as the father of the British free press, a defender of civil and political liberties—and a hero to American colonists. Wilkes’s political career was rancorous, involving duels, imprisonments in the Tower of London, and the Massacre of St. George’s Fields, in which seven of his supporters were shot to death by government troops. He was equally famous for his “private” life—as a confessed libertine, a member of the notorious Hellfire Club, and the author of what has been called the dirtiest poem in the English language.   This lively biography draws a full portrait of John Wilkes from his childhood days through his heyday as a journalist and agitator, his defiance of government prosecutions for libel and obscenity, his fight against exclusion from Parliament, and his service as lord mayor of London on the eve of the American Revolution. Told here with the force and immediacy of a firsthand newspaper account, Wilkes’s own remarkable story is inseparable from the larger story of modern civil liberties and how they came to fruition.   “[Does] justice to Wilkes both as a fiery proponent of individual rights and as . . . a libertine par excellence in an age with no shortage of memorable rakes.” —The New York Times   “It is difficult to believe that John Wilkes, a notorious womanizer and scandal-monger, was a genuine hero of civil liberties and political democracy on both sides of the Atlantic in the late 18th century, but hero he was and in this engaging book Arthur Cash gives Wilkes the serious treatment he has long deserved.” —Eric Foner, Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in History and New York Times–bestselling author of Reconstruction
    Show book
  • The Price of Justice - Money Morals and Ethical Reform in the Law - cover

    The Price of Justice - Money...

    Ronald Goldfarb, Senator Bernie...

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Justice reform has become an increasingly present topic in the news and media, with movements like “I Can’t Breathe” and Black Lives Matter prompting national outcry from the public over the unethical actions of law enforcement, and remains one of the most controversial and highly debated issues for politicians and citizens today. With more than two million American’s incarcerated, it is beyond apparent that the justice system intrinsically ensures that lower-income people and minorities are shockingly underrepresented and offered little to no legal protection. In The Price of Justice, Goldfarb uses powerful testimonies, media evidence, and first-hand expertise from working in the Justice Department as a longtime public interest lawyer to reveal how both the criminal and civil justice systems fail to serve lower and middle-class citizens and makes an undeniable case for the profound justice reform that is so desperately needed. Goldfarb asks that we examine closely a legal system that has become largely pay-to-play, benefiting the administrators and those wealthy citizens who can afford to “lawyer up,” and shows little mercy for the lower-income citizens who fall victim to an endless cycle of conviction, fines, bail, lack of counsel, and capital punishment. Goldfarb exposes a system that values money over ethics and lawyers who value winning cases over finding truth and serving justice, pointing out that civil aid and public defenders are grossly understaffed and underfinanced, making it nearly impossible to meet the challenges of well-paid private lawyers.
    Show book
  • Charlie Wilson's War - cover

    Charlie Wilson's War

    George Crile

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The bestselling true story of a Texas congressman’s secret role in the Afghan defeat of Russian invaders is “a tour de force of reporting and writing” (Dan Rather).   A New York Times, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times bestseller.   Charlie Wilson’s penchant for cocktails and beauty-contest winners was well known, but in the early 1980s, the dilettante congressman quietly conducted one of the most successful covert operations in US history. Using his seat on the House Appropriations Committee, Wilson channeled hundreds of millions of dollars to support a ragged band of Afghan “freedom fighters” in their resistance against Soviet invaders.   Weapons were secretly procured and distributed with the help of an outcast CIA operative named Gust Avrakotos, who stretched the agency’s rules to the breaking point. Moving from the back rooms of Washington to secret chambers at Langley, and from arms-dealers’ conventions to the Khyber Pass, Wilson and Avrakotos helped the mujahideen win an unlikely victory against the Russians.   Adapted into a film starring Tom Hanks, Julia Roberts, and Philip Seymour Hoffman, Charlie Wilson’s War chronicles an overlooked chapter in the collapse of the Soviet Union—and the emergence of a brand-new foe in the form of radical Islam.   “Put the Tom Clancy clones back on the shelf; this covert-ops chronicle is practically impossible to put down. No thriller writer would dare invent Wilson.” —Publishers Weekly   “An engaging, well-written, newsworthy study of practical politics and its sometimes unlikely players, and one with plenty of implications.” —Kirkus Reviews
    Show book