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Moonless Night - The Second World War Escape Epic - cover

Moonless Night - The Second World War Escape Epic

B A 'Jimmy' James

Publisher: Pen & Sword Military

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Summary

“James is the sort of person they write legends about. A participant in the mass escape that was the basis for the movie The Great Escape.” —AudioFile 
 
From the moment he was shot down to the final whistle, Jimmy James’ one aim as a POW of the Germans was to escape. Moonless Night describes his experiences and those of his fellow prisoners in the most gripping and thrilling manner. The author made more than twelve escape attempts including his participation in The Great Escape, where fifty of the seventy-six escapees were executed in cold blood on Hitler’s orders. 
 
On re-capture, James was sent to the infamous Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp where, undeterred, he tunneled out. That was not the end of his remarkable story. 
 
Moonless Night has strong claim to be the finest escape story of the Second World War. 
 
“An amazing story.” —The Sunday Express
Available since: 09/22/2008.
Print length: 224 pages.

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