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How to Learn: The 10 principles of effective revision and practice - Study Skills #3 - cover

How to Learn: The 10 principles of effective revision and practice - Study Skills #3

Fiona McPherson

Publisher: Wayz Press

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Summary

Working ‘hard’ is not enough. To be an effective student, you want to work ‘smart’. 
Being a successful student is far more about being a smart user of effective strategies than about being 'smart'. In Effective Notetaking and Mnemonics for Study, Dr McPherson showed readers many strategies for improving understanding and memory. But these on their own can only take you so far, if you don’t know how to cement that information into your brain for the long term. In this new book, Dr McPherson explains the 10 principles of effective practice and revision. 
Few students know how to learn effectively, which is why they waste so much time going over and over material, as they try to hammer it into their heads. But you don’t need to spend all that time, and you don’t need to endure such boredom. What you need to do is understand how to review your learning in the most optimal way. Using examples from science, math, history, foreign languages, and skill learning, that is what this book aims to teach you. 
As always with the Mempowered books, this book doesn't re-hash the same tired advice that's been peddled for so long, but uses the latest cognitive and educational research to show you what to do to maximize your learning. 
This book is for students who are serious about being successful in study, and teachers who want to know how best to help their students learn.

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