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The Wisdom of Wonder Woman - cover

The Wisdom of Wonder Woman

Signe Bergstrom

Publisher: Chronicle Books LLC

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Summary

Beautiful as Aphrodite, stronger than Hercules, wise as Athena—for more than 75 years, Wonder Woman has inspired and empowered generations of fans with her strength and guidance. This gorgeous collection of quotes from throughout Wonder Woman's iconic history in comics, film, and TV, fully illustrated by a wide range of classic and modern visuals, showcases her wisdom on fighting systems of evil, defying expectations in Man's World, standing up for peace and love, and embodying the true meaning of strength. The Wisdom of Wonder Woman is an uplifting and powerful book for wonder women everywhere.

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