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An Essay on Criticism - cover

An Essay on Criticism

Sheba Blake, Alexander Pope

Publisher: Sheba Blake Publishing

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Summary

Despite its somewhat dry title, this text is not a musty prose dissection of literary criticism. Instead, the piece takes the shape of a long poem in which Pope, at the very peak of his powers, takes merciless aim at many of the best-known writers of his day. The epitome of the subtle but lethal wit Alexander Pope has come to be celebrated for, "An Essay on Criticism" is a fun and enlightening read for Brit-lit fans.
Available since: 11/30/2021.
Print length: 22 pages.

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