Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
The Kentucky Cycle - cover

The Kentucky Cycle

Robert Schenkkan

Publisher: Grove Press

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

The Pulitzer Prize–winning cycle of one-act plays spanning two centuries of American history: “hauntingly memorable [with a] poetic impulse” (Time).   One of the most important contemporary works of political theater, The Kentucky Cycle was awarded the 1992 Pulitzer Prize for its astute and dramatically epic investigation of the brutal birth of America. Set in the Appalachian Mountains and spanning seven generations—from 1775 to 1975—this saga of rural Kentucky digs beneath our American mythology to confront the truth of our national history.   It is the story of three families whose lives are irrevocably intertwined as they struggle for control over a portion of the Cumberland Plateau. From the darker realities of our pioneer heritage to the bloody lessons of the Civil War, and from the Unionization of coal miners to the harsh environmental legacy of strip mining, this fascinating work chronicles the lives of ordinary people struggling to find a better place for themselves in an unpredictable world.   “Serious drama with a dark center . . . an epic.” —The New Yorker   “Riveting theater . . . [a] monumental work.” —Los Angeles Times

Other books that might interest you

  • On the Nature of Things (Watson translation) - cover

    On the Nature of Things (Watson...

    Titus Lucretius Carus

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Written in the first century b.C., On the Nature of Things (in Latin, De Rerum Natura) is a poem in six books that aims at explaining the Epicurean philosophy to the Roman audience. Among digressions about the importance of philosophy in men's life and praises of Epicurus, Lucretius created a solid treatise on the atomic theory, the falseness of religion and many kinds of natural phenomena. With no harm to his philosophical scope, the author composed a didactic poem of epic flavor, of which the imagery and style are highly praised. (Summary by Leni)
    Show book
  • Leaves of Grass - 1855 Edition - cover

    Leaves of Grass - 1855 Edition

    Walt Whitman

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In 1855, Walt Whitman published, at his own expense, the first edition of Leaves of Grass, a visionary volume of twelve poems. Showing the influence of a uniquely American form of mysticism known as Transcendentalism, the writing is distinguished by an explosively innovative free-verse style and previously unmentionable subject matter. Exalting nature, celebrating the human body, and praising the senses and sexual love, this monumental work, now a classic of American poetry, was condemned as immoral upon publication. Included in this edition are some of the greatest poems of modern times, works that continue to upset conventional notions of beauty and originality even today.
    Show book
  • Othello by Shakespeare - cover

    Othello by Shakespeare

    Brothers Grimm, Charles Perrault

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Shakespeare's Othello is a heart-wrenching tale of evil and betrayal; it is the first of Shakespeare's great series of tragedies and history plays. The exotic Moor Othello and his beloved Desdemona are thrown into a mesh of intrigue and matters of the state; their strong love would overcome all of it, were it not for Iago. Trusted by his master Othello, he is actually seeking vengeance against him, and has vowed to destroy the Moor of Venice in the worst possible manner. Through insinuations about Desdemona's infidelity, Iago manages to draw Othello deeper and deeper into his schemes, until a horrific escalation quickly brings the play to a terrible end. This lively adaptation is a convenient summary meant to bring to you Shakespeare's magic in an actual, clear and precise way; recorded by the greatest storytellers, it will bring to you the fundamentals of English culture in a most enjoyable format.
    Show book
  • The Poetry of World War I - Volume I - An Anthology - cover

    The Poetry of World War I -...

    Wilfred Owen, Charles Sorley,...

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In the War a great volume of poetry was written, produced and published in books, periodicals, newspapers or letters back to home.  We often think of War as a necessity.   We fight for a more just and better world.  We often fail. But in our poets we gain a truth and a morality that shocks us, consoles us and holds our values to the light.  In this volume we hear poems from the front, from home, from soldiers, from auxiliaries, from friend and from foe. 
    War and poetry seem somehow alien to each other.  How can the horror and slaughter of war become any more real and terrifying, visceral and tender in the words of poets? 
    The Great War, World War I, the War to End All Wars, was a stain on humanity and the nations who fought in it.  Millions killed or wounded for aims and principles that, for many, are difficult to accept in the modern age. 
    The poet as a soldier has happened throughout history but not to the level of the men in this volume.  Today we are used to ‘embedded journalists’ who report direct from the frontline. Here we have ‘embedded poets’ who report from the frontline in a unique and inspiring way. Their words, often raw, emotional, angry, despairing yet eloquent, moving, suffused with a hope that we are all capable of more despite the futility and carnage around them. These poets including Wilfred Owen, Rupert Brooke, John McCrae, Edward Thomas and several others, including the German Alfred Lichtenstein, lost their lives in the years of war on which they had so eloquently and intensely written.  Their lost lives adding to the toll that war makes us all less whole, less worthy of attaining what we should raise ourselves to be.
    Show book
  • The Ballad of the Harp-Weaver - cover

    The Ballad of the Harp-Weaver

    Edna St. Vincent Millay

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    LibriVox volunteers bring you 7 different recordings of The Ballad of the Harp-Weaver by Edna St. Vincent Millay.
    Show book
  • Gunsmoke Volume 1 - cover

    Gunsmoke Volume 1

    John Meston

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Gunsmoke was an adult western and was the creation of writer, John Meston, and producer-director, Norman Macdonnell. It absolutely took the country by storm. Variety Magazine, the show business journal, called it an amazing presentation, and The New York Times labeled it Something new and entirely exciting in radio. Listeners began sending in thousands of letters voicing their approval. Nothing like it had ever been heard on radio before and was a complete departure from earlier radio western programs such as Tom Mix, The Lone Ranger, and Red Ryder. The dialog, the sound effects, and the music were top notch. Program stories centered around the cattle town of Dodge City, Kansas in the 1870s, with William Conrad as Marshal Matt Dillon, Parley Baer as the marshal's assistant Chester Proudfoot, and veteran actor Howard McNear as country doctor Charles Adams. And the music of Rex Khoury added the final touches. If there ever was a program that accurately depicted the raw violence and danger of the early American west, radio Gunsmoke was it. On April 26, 1952, Gunsmoke aired for the first time on CBS Radio. Its effect was immediate and resounding.
    Show book