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The strange case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - cover

The strange case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Robert Ervin Howard

Publisher: Nórdica Libros

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Summary

First published in English in 1886 is about a lawyer, Gabriel John Utterson, who investigates the strange link between his old friend, Dr. Henry Jekyll, and the misanthropic Edward Hyde. The book is known to be a vivid representation of psychopathology for a split personality.
The illustrations in this edition are by Marta Gómez-painted, illustrated in this same collection of Alice in Wonderland.

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