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Strange Science - Oddball Inventions Disastrous Discoveries Eccentric Scientists and Earth-Shattering Eurekas - cover

Strange Science - Oddball Inventions Disastrous Discoveries Eccentric Scientists and Earth-Shattering Eurekas

Press Editors of Portable

Publisher: Portable Press

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Summary

This entertaining compendium of bite-sized articles reveals the stranger-than-sci-fi world of strange science.   From the oddest theories to the most astounding discoveries to the biggest blunders, Strange Science has all the facts your professors didn't teach you in science class. It's packed with earth-shattering eurekas, outlandish inventions, silly “scientific” studies, and the stories behind the weirdos who made it all happen. Put on your lab coat and get ready to discover . . . One dentist's quest to clone John LennonHow to hypnotize a chickenReal-life time travelers (or so they claim)The seven-year-long study that found earthquakes are not caused by catfish waving their tails . . . and other breakthrough findings Plus you’ll discover unbelievable inventions; the freakiest franken-foods scientists have created; some of Hollywood’s worst on-screen science blunders; and more! This amazing volume from the Bathroom Readers’ Institute contains the strangest short science articles from dozens of Bathroom Readers, along with fifty all-new pages.</
Available since: 06/01/2017.
Print length: 416 pages.

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