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One More Theory About Happiness - A Memoir - cover

One More Theory About Happiness - A Memoir

Paul Guest

Publisher: HarperCollins e-books

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Summary

“In these lyrical, searing pages, Guest manages to break our hearts and put them back together again.”—Ann Hood 
In the tradition of Lucy Grealy’s Autobiography of a Face, One More Theory About Happiness is a bold and original memoir from the acclaimed, Whiting Award-winning poet Paul Guest, author of My Index of Horrifying Knowledge. A remarkable account of the accident that left him a quadriplegic, and his struggle to find independence, love, and a life on his own terms, One More Theory About Happiness has been praised by Charles Bock, author of Beautiful Children, as, “Smart and honest and clear eyed and above all, humane.” 
 

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