Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
One More Theory About Happiness - A Memoir - cover

One More Theory About Happiness - A Memoir

Paul Guest

Publisher: HarperCollins e-books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

“In these lyrical, searing pages, Guest manages to break our hearts and put them back together again.”—Ann Hood 
In the tradition of Lucy Grealy’s Autobiography of a Face, One More Theory About Happiness is a bold and original memoir from the acclaimed, Whiting Award-winning poet Paul Guest, author of My Index of Horrifying Knowledge. A remarkable account of the accident that left him a quadriplegic, and his struggle to find independence, love, and a life on his own terms, One More Theory About Happiness has been praised by Charles Bock, author of Beautiful Children, as, “Smart and honest and clear eyed and above all, humane.” 
 

Who read this book also read:

  • The Transcendental Meditation Technique and The Journey of Enlightenment - cover

    The Transcendental Meditation...

    Ann Purcell

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Enlightenment has long been regarded as a state reserved for a few rare individuals, a state that can only be gained by living a recluse life in a cave or in a monastery somewhere. It has been thought that enlightenment is very difficult to achieve, requiring one to give up all worldly possessions and to lead an austere life. Ann Purcell debunks these false assumptions in her new book The Transcendental Meditation Technique The Journey of Enlightenment. By relating her own experiences and those of Transcendental Meditation practitioners throughout the world Purcell lays before us the secret to personal fulfillment, spontaneity, inner peace and balance. She deftly explains how's and why's so that every person around the world can experience enlightenment and unbounded bliss inside, no matter what their race, religion, or socio-economic background.
    2015 Silver Medal Winner from Living Now Book Awards
    Show book
  • Women in Dark Times - cover

    Women in Dark Times

    Jacqueline Rose

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Jacqueline Rose's new book begins with three remarkable women: revolutionary socialist Rosa Luxemburg; German–Jewish painter Charlotte Salomon, persecuted by family tragedy and Nazism; film icon and consummate performer Marilyn Monroe. 
       
     Together these women have a shared story to tell, as they blaze a trail across some of the most dramatic events of the last century – revolution, totalitarianism, the American dream. Enraged by injustice, they are each in touch with what is most painful about being human, bound together by their willingness to bring the unspeakable to light. 
       
     Taking the argument into the present are today's women, courageous individuals involved in some of the cruellest realities of our times. Grappling with the reality of honour killing – notably through the stories of Shafilea Ahmed, Fadime Sahindal and Heshu Yones – Rose argues that the work of feminism is far from done. In the final three chapters, she celebrates the work of three brilliant contemporary artists – Esther Shalev-Gerz, Yael Bartana and Thérèse Oulton – whose work grows out of an unflinching engagement with all that is darkest in the modern world.  
       
     Women in Dark Times shows us how these visionary women offer a new template for feminism. Taking their stand against the iniquities of our times, they tread a path between public and private pain, confronting us with what we need most urgently, but also often, cannot bear to see.
    Show book
  • Valley of the Kings - cover

    Valley of the Kings

    Cecelia Holland

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    An enthralling fictional account of Howard Carter’s famous search for the tomb of King Tut and the mystery behind the tragic death and disappearance of ancient Egypt’s child ruler In ancient times, a boy king occupied the throne in a troubled desert land. His name was Tutankhamun. Both his reign and his life were shockingly brief, and his burial place was unknown—mysteries that would intrigue the inquisitive for centuries to come.   An English archaeologist irresistibly drawn to Egypt and her secrets, Howard Carter arrives in the Middle East in the second decade of the twentieth century to uncover the hidden final resting place of the tragic child pharaoh. But from the outset his search is plagued by misfortune and obstruction—a corrupt and unbending Egyptian bureaucracy, a British lord and patron more interested in profit than in knowledge, and Carter’s own inability to connect with his fellow human beings. Still, he will not be deterred from his obsessive hunt for the answer to one of the most astonishing puzzles in the history of the world.   In her magnificent novel Valley of the Kings, Cecelia Holland has created two worlds, brilliantly re-creating Egypt in the 1920s and in the time of Tutankhamun. A stunning tale of determination and discovery, brimming with color, mystery, and life, it confirms her standing as one of the true masters of historical fiction.
    Show book
  • Head in Heaven - cover

    Head in Heaven

    Barbro Curman

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    "You have to get used to this!" I heard a voice say. I trembled as I experienced a presence at the right side of my dinner table. I managed to stay put, playing the guest-just-having-a-dinner role. I more or less rushed to my room when dinner was over. "What is this?" I thought. "You have to get used to this!" I heard again. Then I got a peaceful, personal explanation of how this cooperation will be done; me in a physical body on Earth and he being on the other side bringing higher frequencies and wider perspectives. It was now the third time the voice said: "You have to get used to this!" This time my answer came from all of me, clearly and determined. "Yes!!!" My intention was clear, and I knew that I would be cared for if my fear would come back. In this personal way Barbro is sharing her inner journey with us. Time has come, she says, when we need to be more open about these kinds of experiences. In my practice, she continues, I have met many, who like me before, keep hiding away what is the greatest gift in their life. They do not want to be ridiculed as is often the case even in our open society. Barbro claims that today, we cannot afford being ruled by this. We are facing a time in history, when we as human beings are on our way to destroy our beautiful home, our planet. It is urgent that as many as possible of us focus in our hearts and passion taking us beyond our survival strategies based on fear. Daring to receive unconditional love from beyond will be our greatest gift in opening our hearts. Although she is following her own intimate path, Barbro has been applying her gift in everyday life as a psychologist, organisational consultant and a Gestalt therapist since the 1970s. She believes in the power of the group and has great faith in what people are able to accomplish when and if they build their co-operation on trust and true intention. Among other things - this is what she teaches in her professional life.
    Show book
  • Closing Time - The True Story of the "Goodbar" Murder - cover

    Closing Time - The True Story of...

    Lacey Fosburgh

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    The real story behind the murder of a Manhattan schoolteacher that became a symbol of the dangers of casual sex: “A first-rate achievement” (Truman Capote). In 1973, Roseann Quinn, an Irish-Catholic teacher at a school for deaf children, was killed in New York City after bringing a man home to her apartment from an Upper West Side pub. The crime would not only make headlines, but would soon be fictionalized in the #1 New York Times–bestselling novel Looking for Mr. Goodbar and adapted into a film of the same name, starring Diane Keaton and Richard Gere. The case evolved a cultural phenomenon, sparking debates about the sexual revolution and the perils of the “pickup scene” at what were popularly known as singles bars.   In this groundbreaking, inventive true crime tale, the New York Times reporter first assigned to the story offers “a meticulous, investigative account of the so-called Goodbar killing” (Los Angeles Times). Using a dramatization technique in which she gives the victim a different name, Lacey Fosburgh veers between the chilling, suspenseful personal interactions leading up to the brutal stabbing and the gritty facts of the aftermath, including the NYPD investigation and the arrest of John Wayne Wilson.   The result is a must-read that earned an Edgar Award nomination for Best Fact Crime, and a classic of the genre that Men’s Journal described as “more riveting, and more tragic, than the Judith Rossner novel—and the 1977 movie Looking for Mr. Goodbar.” In the words of the New York Times, “Fosburgh writes with compassion of these sick and shattered lives.”  
    Show book
  • The Glass Closet - Why Coming Out Is Good Business - cover

    The Glass Closet - Why Coming...

    John Browne

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Part memoir and part social criticism, The Glass Closet addresses the issue of homophobia that still pervades corporations around the world and underscores the immense challenges faced by LGBT employees. 
    In The Glass Closet, Lord John Browne, former CEO of BP, seeks to unsettle business leaders by exposing the culture of homophobia that remains rampant in corporations around the world, and which prevents employees from showing their authentic selves. 
    Drawing on his own experiences, and those of prominent members of the LGBT community around the world, as well as insights from well-known business leaders and celebrities, Lord Browne illustrates why, despite the risks involved, self-disclosure is best for employees—and for the businesses that support them. Above all, The Glass Closet offers inspiration and support for those who too often worry that coming out will hinder their chances of professional success.
    Show book