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Singa-Pura-Pura - Malay Speculative Fiction from Singapore - cover

Singa-Pura-Pura - Malay Speculative Fiction from Singapore

Nazry Bahrawi

Publisher: Ethos Books

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Summary

From a future of electronic doas and AI psychotherapists, sense-activated communion with forests and a portal to realms undersea, to a reimagined origin and afterlife—editor and translator Nazry Bahrawi brings together an exciting selection of never-before translated and new Malay spec-fic stories by established and emerging writers from Singapore.  
 
 
Especially in an anglophone-dominated genre, very little of Malay speculative fiction from Singapore is known to readers here and beyond. Yet contemporary Bahasa literature here is steeped in spec-fic writing that can account as a literary movement (aliran)—and unmistakably draws from the minority Malay experience in a city obsessed with progress.
Available since: 08/10/2022.
Print length: 200 pages.

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