Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Said Like Reeds or Things - cover

Said Like Reeds or Things

Mark Truscott

Publisher: Coach House Books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Warning: this book may encourage a series of ungrammatical thoughts! 
Welcome to the poetic landscape of Mark Truscott, where less is more than you bargained for. Said Like Reeds or Things is a book of micropoetic and linguistic koans. With a quirky, off-centre sense of humour, these poems uncover a language that has malfunctioned only to find itself in the form of a gesture. 
Minimalist in form, these small gatherings of words, a.k.a. 'poems', seek strangeness in familiar language; their effect is harmonic dissonance within the mind – like an overturned toy box in your path to the television set, these poems are a fresh and amusing diversion from the everyday from which they are derived. Mysteriously entertaining and precise, these succinct, visual lyrics say as much about the world as they do about their own status as objects for reading, and they persist in the hilarity and contemplation of their own enigmatic possibilities. 
'Mark Truscott's Said Like Reeds or Things is the work of a mischievous conservationist with a shadow of Basho in the mix. It's sometimes snappy, sometimes calm, and always an exhilarating tease. This is the place where little pieces of perfection ride along a sublime horizon line.' 
 – Lisa Jarnot

Other books that might interest you

  • A Visit From Saint Nicholas - cover

    A Visit From Saint Nicholas

    Clement Clarke Moore

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    LibriVox volunteers bring you 24 recordings of A Visit From Saint Nicholas by Clement Clarke Moore. More commonly known today as 'Twas the Night Before Christmas. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for December 13th, 2009.
    Show book
  • Gunsmoke Volume 15 - cover

    Gunsmoke Volume 15

    John Meston

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Marshall Matt Dillon was different from the traditional Western hero radio archetype because he stood alone and had no real friendships. Dillon had only one person that he trusted in Dodge City, and that was Chester Wesley Proudfoot, an amiable expatriate from Waco. Though never directly implied in the radio series, there are some hints that Chester Wesley Proudfoot was of Native American Indian heritage. When Gunsmoke made the transition to television, Chester’s surname was changed from Proudfoot to Goode, indicating Chester, in his radio incarnation, was indeed a “half-breed”. Prior to Gunsmoke, characters of mixed ethnicities had a long and established history of being portrayed on radio as damaged goods, incapable of being trusted. The only previous exception to this stereotyping rule of radio Westerns was The Lone Ranger, which loudly spoke out against such prejudices. Chester officially working with Marshal Dillon was never actually set in concrete. While Chester was Dillon’s friend, partner, and foil, his exact job title and status remained elusive throughout the series. Chester is first described by Dillon as his deputy in the episode titled “Post Martin” on December 13, 1952. Yet on July 5, 1954, Dillon states that Chester is not his deputy in the episode “Hank Prine.” Whatever his job title was, Chester was Dillon’s constant friend. Listen to the Sparkling Audio Quality in Radio Archives restoration of Gunsmoke, Volume 15.
    Show book
  • Petals - cover

    Petals

    Amy Lowell

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    LibriVox volunteers bring you 15 recordings of Petals by Amy Lowell. This was the Weekly Poetry project for November 27, 2011.Amy Lawrence Lowell (February 9, 1874 – May 12, 1925) was an American poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926. Lowell was born into Brookline's prominent Lowell family, sister to astronomer Percival Lowell and Harvard president Abbott Lawrence Lowell.She never attended college because her family did not consider that proper for a woman, but she compensated with avid reading and near-obsessive book collecting. She lived as a socialite and travelled widely, turning to poetry in 1902 after being inspired by a performance of Eleonora Duse in Europe. In the post-World War II years, Lowell, like other women writers, was largely forgotten, but with the renaissance of the women's movement in the 1970s, women's studies brought her back to light. According to Heywood Broun, however, Lowell personally argued against feminism. Her poem, “Petals” is published in her collection A Dome of Many-Colored Glass (1912). (Summary adapted from Wikipedia by Bob Gonzalez)
    Show book
  • The Poetry Of Sara Teasdale - cover

    The Poetry Of Sara Teasdale

    Sara Teasdale

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Sara Trevor Teasdale was born on 8th August, 1884 in St Louis, Missouri.  A child of poor health she was 14 years old when she was well enough to begin school.  Her first poetry publication was in 1907 with her second book in 1911. She was courted by Vachel Lindsay, a great poet but one who thought he could not provide a suitable standard of living so Sara married Ernst Filsinger and the couple moved to New York City.   In 1917 she released the poetry collection Love Songs and the following year it won three awards: the Columbia University Poetry Society prize, the 1918 Pulitzer Prize for poetry and the annual prize of the Poetry Society of America. By 1929 Sara was deeply unhappy and divorced but remained in New York where she soon resumed her friendship with Vachel Lindsay, who was by this time married with children.   In 1931 Vachel Lindsay committed suicide. Two years later Sara too was dead - overdosing on sleeping pills. She is buried in the Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis.
    Show book
  • Favourite Scenes From Shakespeare - cover

    Favourite Scenes From Shakespeare

    William Shakespeare

    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
    In 2012, the World Shakespeare Festival surveyed Britons as to their favourite plays by Shakespeare.  This collection consists of 21 scenes from the most popular plays written by arguably the greatest writer in the English language, possibly any language.  It is an homage to the Bard in celebration of the 400th anniversary of his death in 1616 -- the Shakespeare Quadricentennial. - Summary by John Burlinson Roles performed by: Beth Thomas, Michele Eaton, Sonia, Tony Addison and John BurlinsonEditing done mainly by Michele Eaton and John Burlinson
    Show book
  • In Harmony with Nature - cover

    In Harmony with Nature

    Matthew Arnold

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    LibriVox volunteers bring you 16 recordings of In Harmony with Nature. by Matthew Arnold. This was the Weekly Poetry project for July 8, 2012.Matthew Arnold was a British poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools. He was the son of Thomas Arnold, the famed headmaster of Rugby School, and brother to both Tom Arnold, literary professor, and William Delafield Arnold, novelist and colonial administrator. Matthew Arnold has been characterized as a sage writer, a type of writer who chastises and instructs the reader on contemporary social issues.Arnold is sometimes called the third great Victorian poet, along with Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Robert Browning. (Summary from Wikipedia)
    Show book