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Beholden - cover

Beholden

Lesley Crewe

Publisher: Vagrant Press

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Summary

The author of Relative Happiness—now an award-winning film—“shines a light on the secrets and lies that bind generations of Cape Breton families” (Toronto Star).   The story begins with Nell, the “spinster on the hill” near St. Peter’s, Cape Breton. Scarred by her own childhood, she swears she could never love a child and that she will never marry, denying herself a life with the man she loves. She’s proven wrong when a baby is born just down the road from her. Her love of little Jane, despite herself, propels us forward through generations trying to untangle their own traumas and secrets. Eventually, we meet Bridie—joyful, kind, capable Bridie—and see her struggling through the echoing pain of those who came before her. Her choices, her bravery, her “nest of wonderful women,” and her ultimate refusal to settle for anything less than love, eventually redeem her and everyone around her—even the spinster on the hill.   “Beholden takes place between the 1920s and 1970s in Sydney and St. Peter’s. It’s a story about four characters, redemption, loyalty and how secrets can reverberate over years.” —Cape Breton Post

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