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Sirens - How to Pee Standing Up: An Alarming Memoir of Combat and Coming Back Home - cover

Sirens - How to Pee Standing Up: An Alarming Memoir of Combat and Coming Back Home

Laura Naylor Colbert

Publisher: Warriors Publishing Group

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Summary

There’s a steep learning curve for every American soldier who deploys to the Middle East war zone. Much of that involves culture shock, and the excitement and confusion also applies to female soldiers. And when that female soldier is also a Military Police Officer, the curve gets bent way out of shape. Laura Colbert was heartland-bred and tough enough when the Army sent her to an MP unit in Baghdad, but she quickly discovered soldiering in Iraq involved a lot more than she expected.
 
How to establish her military cop cred? How to deal with chauvinistic soldiers? How to deal with Iraqis—men who disrespected her and women who initially distrusted her? How much military law applied in a lawless land? And dealing with even the simplest things, like how to pee standing up. Laura managed it and survived, but the learning curve just bent in another direction when she came home from war suffering with stress and anxiety that eventually bloomed into Post-Traumatic Stress.

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